Deed In Lieu | FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA

Tag Archive | "deed in lieu"

Freddie Mac to Servicers of its loans trying to go after deficiency from short sale, deed-in-lieu ‘Don’t Go There’

Freddie Mac to Servicers of its loans trying to go after deficiency from short sale, deed-in-lieu ‘Don’t Go There’


DEFICIENCY FROM SHORT PAYOFFS AND DEEDS-IN-LIEU OF FORECLOSURE

We have updated the Guide to reinforce the requirement that the Servicer, for itself and on behalf of Freddie Mac, must waive all rights to pursue payment of the remaining balance owed by the Borrower under a Freddie Mac-owned Mortgage for all approved short payoffs and deed-in-lieu of foreclosure transactions that have closed in accordance with the Guide and applicable law.

Sections B65.41, Closing, Reporting and Remittance Requirements, and B65.48, Closing, Reporting and
Remittance Requirements, have been updated to reflect this additional information.

[ipaper docId=82005758 access_key=key-1fyhr5ku2oigp3qa2kq1 height=600 width=600 /]

 

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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H. R. 3566 – To ensure uniformity and fairness in deficiency judgments arising from foreclosures on mortgages for single family homes

H. R. 3566 – To ensure uniformity and fairness in deficiency judgments arising from foreclosures on mortgages for single family homes


WASHINGTON, DC – Rep. Edolphus “Ed” Towns (NY-10) introduced today H.R. 3566, the Fairness in Foreclosure Act, a bill which will standardize the length of time after a foreclosure that a mortgage company can bring a deficiency judgment against a homeowner. The bill will also prohibit lenders from bringing a deficiency judgment against low-income borrowers.

“At a time when so many Americans are out of work due to the excesses of the financial industry, we must protect those who are unable to protect themselves. I am fully committed to offering relief to struggling homeowners across the country,” Rep. Towns stated.  “That is why I have introduced the Fairness in Foreclosure Act.  A deficiency judgment after foreclosure seems to be one of the greatest injustices that occur to homeowners after they have gone through the arduous foreclosure process.  Not only are they behind by thousands of dollars on their mortgage payments and facing public auction of their houses, the ordeal may continue indefinitely. “

In some states lenders have the option to pursue borrowers for deficiency judgments up to six years after the date of the foreclosure sale.  If a borrower is sued for a deficiency judgment for the amount that the bank does not recover after a foreclosure sale, then they may have to pay tens of thousands of dollars years later for their one financial hardship. H.R. 3566, if enacted, would provide a fair and balanced process, while bringing relief to homeowners as they struggle to get back on their feet again post-foreclosure.

###

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
DECEMBER 6, 2011

Mr. TOWNS (for himself and Mr. GUTIERREZ) introduced the following bill;
which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary

A BILL
To ensure uniformity and fairness in deficiency judgments
arising from foreclosures on mortgages for single family
homes.

1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representa2
tives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
3 SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
4 This Act may be cited as the ‘‘Fairness in Fore5
closures Act of 2011’’.
6 SEC. 2. REQUIREMENTS FOR DEFICIENCY JUDGMENTS.
7 No action for a deficiency judgment arising from an
8 obligation under a residential mortgage may be brought
9 except in accordance with this Act.

[ipaper docId=75179071 access_key=key-1oua9dih8t888eevgqz6 height=600 width=600 /]

Source: http://towns.house.gov

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DEED in LIEU | ‘Zombie notes’ live to haunt deed transfers

DEED in LIEU | ‘Zombie notes’ live to haunt deed transfers


Thousands affected by Fannie Mae tactics

NEWS-PRESS-

David Cruz Jr. got what he believed was a great offer in a foreclosure lawsuit filed against him by giant mortgage lender Fannie Mae.

If Cruz deeded the modest Fort Myers investment house back to Fannie Mae, the government-backed company would release him from the loan’s $123,750 note: the obligation underlying his mortgage.

He deeded the house back to Fannie Mae, but court records show he didn’t get what he bargained for.

Continue Reading [NEWS-PRESS]

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Moody’s Questions Feasibility of Fannie Mae’s Strategic Default Policy

Moody’s Questions Feasibility of Fannie Mae’s Strategic Default Policy


Edit: From a viewer who makes it clear.

The GSE rule is: A borrower is denied equal access to government supported financial markets for seven years unless the borrower “waives” rights to challenge servicer claims? This is a direct attempt to deprive an individual of access to the legal system in order to redress grievances. This is an unconstitutional exercise of power by these quaisi-govt authorities controlled by government. If the govt cannot do that in its own name–how can it be proper to do it under a nameplate of an entity owned and controlled by the government. Aside from implications in respect of civil liberties, it is not even good financial policy for servicers and lenders to be automatically released of liability for predatory lending and collection activities. This rule can have only one effect and that is to encourage more abuses. This is tantamount to abolishing judicial oversight of lending abuses.

By: Carrie Bay 07/26/2010 DSNEWS

Last month, Fannie Mae announced new policy changes intended to deter financially competent homeowners from walking away from their mortgage obligation by imposing stiffer penalties for strategic default – a phenomenon that has become increasingly more common as home prices have plummeted and more and more borrowers find that they owe more on their mortgage than the home is worth.

The GSE says borrowers who intentionally default when they had the capacity to pay or those who do not complete a workout alternative in good faith will be ineligible for a new Fannie Mae-backed mortgage for a period of seven years from the date of foreclosure.

Fannie Mae says the policy change is designed to encourage borrowers to work with their servicers and pursue alternatives to foreclosure. While a bold attempt at preventing unnecessary foreclosures, the analysts at Moody’s Investors Service argue that the GSE may encounter snags ahead since figuring out who to penalize for strategically walking away will be a significant challenge and implementing the policy could be difficult.

Previously, the GSE barred homeowners who’d been foreclosed on from obtaining a new mortgage for five years. However, Fannie Mae’s new policy extends the foreclosure-waiting period to seven years unless the borrower can prove that they faced extenuating circumstances when they defaulted on the loan.

For borrowers who can prove hardship or document that they attempted to contact their servicer to obtain a loan workout, the waiting period could be reduced to as little as three years. For borrowers who attempt to “gracefully exit” their mortgage obligation by means of a short sale or a deed in lieu may only have to wait two years to obtain a new Fannie Mae mortgage.

Continue reading… DSNEWS.com

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in concealment, conspiracy, deed in lieu, fannie mae, fico, foreclosure, foreclosure mills, foreclosures, servicers, short sale, STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD, walk awayComments (1)

Awwwe Man… OUR CREDIT SCORE SUCKS Y’ALL!!!

Awwwe Man… OUR CREDIT SCORE SUCKS Y’ALL!!!


DinSFLA here: Before you read into this *new* PR move and get all wound up…you MUST read the post I made FAIR ISAAC CORPORATION aka FICO: Now Worthless…

These banks knew all to well where we were heading and they could have stopped this a long time ago!

Don’t fall into their credit trap to make you think you are worth a stupid number! Just know how to survive and work around it. Yes places like employers and insurance companies now rate you by this but you know what? It is what it is. Your health and your mind will not suffer from this… They want you to live, breathe their credit!

More Americans’ credit scores sink to new lows

By EILEEN AJ CONNELLY (AP) –

NEW YORK — The credit scores of millions more Americans are sinking to new lows.

Figures provided by FICO Inc. show that 25.5 percent of consumers — nearly 43.4 million people — now have a credit score of 599 or below, marking them as poor risks for lenders. It’s unlikely they will be able to get credit cards, auto loans or mortgages under the tighter lending standards banks now use.

Because consumers relied so heavily on debt to fuel their spending in recent years, their restricted access to credit is one reason for the slow economic recovery.

“I don’t get paid for loan applications, I get paid for closings,” said Ritch Workman, a Melbourne, Fla., mortgage broker. “I have plenty of business, but I’m struggling to stay open.”

FICO’s latest analysis is based on consumer credit reports as of April. Its findings represent an increase of about 2.4 million people in the lowest credit score categories in the past two years. Before the Great Recession, scores on FICO’s 300-to-850 scale weren’t as volatile, said Andrew Jennings, chief research officer for FICO in Minneapolis. Historically, just 15 percent of the 170 million consumers with active credit accounts, or 25.5 million people, fell below 599, according to data posted on Myfico.com.

More are likely to join their ranks. It can take several months before payment missteps actually drive down a credit score. The Labor Department says about 26 million people are out of work or underemployed, and millions more face foreclosure, which alone can chop 150 points off an individual’s score. Once the damage is done, it could be years before this group can restore their scores, even if they had strong credit histories in the past.

On the positive side, the number of consumers who have a top score of 800 or above has increased in recent years. At least in part, this reflects that more individuals have cut spending and paid down debt in response to the recession. Their ranks now stand at 17.9 percent, which is notably above the historical average of 13 percent, though down from 18.7 percent in April 2008 before the market meltdown.

There’s also been a notable shift in the important range of people with moderate credit, those with scores between 650 and 699. The new data shows that this group comprised 11.9 percent of scores. This is down only marginally from 12 percent in 2008, but reflects a drop of roughly 5.3 million people from its historical average of 15 percent.

This group is significant because it may feel the effects of lenders’ tighter credit standards the most, said FICO’s Jennings. Consumers on the lowest end of the scale are less likely to try to borrow. However, people with mid-range scores that had been eligible for credit before the meltdown are looking to buy homes or cars but finding it hard to qualify for affordable loans.

Workman has seen this firsthand.

A customer with a score of 679 recently walked away from buying a house because he could not get the best interest rate on a $100,000 mortgage. Had his score been 680, the rate he was offered would have been a half-percent lower. The difference was only about $31 per month, but over a 30-year mortgage would have added up to more than $11,000.

“There was nothing derogatory on his credit report,” Workman said of the customer. He had, however, recently gotten an auto loan, which likely lowered his score.

Studies have shown FICO scores are generally reliable predictions of consumer payment behavior, but Workman’s experience points to one drawback of credit scoring: lenders can’t differentiate between two people with the same score. Another consumer might have a 679 score because of several late payments, which could indicate he or she is a bigger repayment risk.

On a broader scale, some of the spike in foreclosures came about because homeowners were financially irresponsible, while others lost their jobs and could no longer pay their mortgages. Yet both reasons for foreclosures have the same impact on a borrower’s FICO score.

In the past too much credit was handed out based on scores alone, without considering how much debt consumers could pay back, said Edmund Tribue, a senior vice president in the credit risk practice at MasterCard Advisors. Now the ability to repay the debt is a critical part of the lending decision.

Workman still thinks credit scores alone play too big a role. “The pendulum has swung too far,” he said. “We absolutely swung way too far in the liberal lending, but did we have to swing so far back the other way?”

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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Well, Would You Look At That…Homeowners Scared the Heck Out of Fannie Mae

Well, Would You Look At That…Homeowners Scared the Heck Out of Fannie Mae


A few weeks ago, Fannie Mae issued an outright threat to homeowners in this country, creating a new rule that would punish anyone who stops paying their mortgage and walks away from their home, referred to as a “strategic default,” by not allowing those who choose that path to get a Fannie Mae loan for seven years.

They call it their “Seven-Year Lockout Policy for Strategic Defaulters,” and if you haven’t realized it already… look what’s been accomplished here: Homeowners have scared the heck out of industry giant, Fannie Mae.  I mean… these guys are shaking like leaves, absolutely running scared.  I know homeowners have been feeling like they have no power against the bankers, but this should prove otherwise.  It’s like we pushed the bully, and the bully ran home and got his Mom to come lay down a new rule in response.

On Fannie’s Website, Terence Edwards, Executive Vice President for Credit Portfolio Management has the following to say about the new rule:

“Walking away from a mortgage is bad for borrowers and bad for communities and our approach is meant to deter the disturbing trend toward strategic defaulting.”

Bad for borrowers, Terrence?  Really, how so?  Are you trying to say that people who walk away from their underwater mortgages are doing it because it’s bad for them?  Because I don’t think they think that, Terence.  I’m pretty sure that those that choose to walk away from their mortgages do so because they’ve figured out that it’s better for them… in their own best interests, as they say.

Hey Terrence, you disingenuous prick, I understand that my walking away from my mortgage is bad for you, but that’s only because my house is now worth half of what I owe.  You wouldn’t mind if I walked away from my mortgage if I had equity, right?  So, in other words, you want me to lose the couple hundred grand instead of you, does that about sum up your position here?  Yeah, well… I’m sure you do.  But I, on the other hand, would prefer that you lose the money instead of me.  Sorry about that.

Terrence, last I checked you’re just a giant failed mortgage lender who is as much a part of why we’re in this mess as any, and you’re going to need $1.5 trillion in taxpayer dollars to bail you out.

I’m a taxpayer, Terrence… isn’t that enough of a loss for me to take on your behalf?  You want me to contribute my tax dollars and probably my child’s future tax dollars to your $1.5 trillion bailout.  And on top of that, you also want me to eat the loss of a couple hundred grand on my house?

Geeze… when are you guys planning to kick in on this?  Your CEO gets a $6 million a year salary, I looked it up, and best I can tell he gets paid to say “yes” to just about everything.  I don’t know, Terrence, but I’m pretty sure that I could have bankrupted Fannie Mae for a lot less than $1.5 trillion.

Walking away from a $500,000 mortgage on a house that’s now worth $250,000 isn’t bad for the borrower, it’s good for the borrower… it makes all the financial sense in the world, for the borrower.  I mean, would you recommend that someone hold onto a stock that’s lost half its value.

Continue reading…Mandleman Matters

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in conspiracy, CONTROL FRAUD, corruption, fannie mae, foreclosure, foreclosure fraud, foreclosures, STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD, walk awayComments (1)

Foreclosure alternative gaining favor: Deeds in Lieu

Foreclosure alternative gaining favor: Deeds in Lieu


Saturday, June 26, 2010 Washington Post

Short sales have been the hot solution for financially stressed homeowners and their lenders for the past year, but here’s another potent foreclosure alternative that’s about to take center stage: deeds in lieu.

Some of the largest mortgage servicers and lenders in the country are gearing up campaigns to reach out to carefully targeted borrowers with cash incentives that sometimes range into five figures, plus a simple message: Let’s bypass the time-consuming hassles of short sales and foreclosures. Just deed us the title to your underwater home, and we’ll call it a deal. We won’t come after you to collect any deficiency between what you owe us on the mortgage and what we obtain from the home sale. We might even be able to wrap up the whole transaction in as little as 30 to 45 days. How about it?

Mortgage companies say troubled borrowers are increasingly signing up. One of the largest servicers, Bank of America, has mailed 100,000 deed-in-lieu solicitations to customers in the past 60 days, and its volume of completed transactions is breaking company records, according to officials.

What are deeds in lieu? The full name is deeds in lieu of foreclosure. They are voluntary transfers of property ownership from borrowers to creditors that make court-directed foreclosures unnecessary.

The concept is one of the oldest in real estate, but it got a special boost this year when the Obama administration included it as an option in its Home Affordable Foreclosure Alternatives program, and mortgage giant Fannie Mae cut the penalty-box time for homeowners who use the technique from four years to two before they can qualify for another home mortgage.

Deeds in lieu also are surging because they provide a win-win for borrowers and mortgage investors that short sales often cannot match. Tops on the list: speed. Travis Hamel Olsen, chief operating officer of Loan Resolution, a Scottsdale, Ariz., firm that works with lenders to solve troubled borrowers’ problems, said deeds in lieu represent “a very expeditious way to move on” for underwater borrowers who are facing potential foreclosure.

“A lot of owners just want to be finished with it now,” he said. “They don’t want to deal with [the house] anymore.” They don’t want to deal with real estate agents or signs on the front lawn that reveal their financial squeeze to neighbors. They don’t want to haggle with potential buyers coming in with lowball offers. But they also don’t want to simply walk away — strategically default — because that will crater their credit files and scores for as much as seven years.

Greg Hebner, president of the MOS Group of San Diego, which also works with banks and investors across the country to resolve defaulting borrowers’ situations, said a key motivation is that lenders are stuck with massive backlogs of underwater homes that haven’t yet gone through foreclosure and been put on the market — the so-called shadow inventory.

Not only is it cheaper for them to do deeds in lieu to gain control of those properties, but with mortgage rates below 5 percent, they also will probably be able to resell them faster and on potentially more favorable terms in the summer and fall.

“If you can get a lot of inventory moving in the next couple of months” of prime home-buying season, Hebner said, “you are solving a lot of problems.”

Matt Vernon, Bank of America’s top short sale and deed-in-lieu executive, said the technique works so well for borrowers and mortgage owners that his company is running pilot programs in major housing markets to alert borrowers who might benefit but are not familiar with deeds in lieu.

To sweeten the pot, Bank of America is offering cash incentives that range from $3,000 to $15,000 — and is getting a strong response, Vernon said.

What are the downsides or limitations of deeds in lieu for homeowners? Probably the most important, experts said, is that they don’t work for every situation involving serious mortgage default. For example, if you have equity in the property, you’ll probably want to pursue a loan modification first, then a short sale, rather than hand your equity stake over to the lender.

Deeds in lieu usually don’t work when there are multiple mortgages from different creditors encumbering the property. Also, though deeds in lieu do less damage to borrowers’ credit histories than foreclosures or bankruptcies, they definitely leave a mark.

Fair Isaac, developer of the widely used FICO credit score, said on its “MyFico” Web site that deeds in lieu and short sales are treated as “not paid as agreed” accounts and are treated the same by the FICO scoring model.

Related Story:

OMG!! Want to leave your mortgage behind and make $10K in less than 30 days?

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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OMG!! Want to leave your mortgage behind and make $10K in less than 30 days?

OMG!! Want to leave your mortgage behind and make $10K in less than 30 days?


6/9/2010 by DinSFLA

This week Housingwire wrote an article about how Bank of America is putting short sales ahead of REO’s. Matt Vernon, who is the short sale and REO executive at BOF made this statement.

“We’re going to do everything possible to liquidate property prior to foreclosure,” Vernon said. “REO will still be available, but we will do everything we can to do short sales.” Vernon said the goal is to get as close to market value as possible, or even over market value. “Short sales is not an investment strategy to get homes on the cheap,” he said.

He added that agents who want a part of that market need to make short sales a major part of their business strategy through 2010 and into 2011.

Does he even have the slightest clue as to what these short sales have done to many agents? Well let me explain in one word…FORECLOSURE!

Why? You may ask. Simply because BOF like many others took their sweet ole, no good, money hungry ass time, I mean 6-12 months to get approvals and by this time anxious buyers lost their financing not once but maybe 3-4 times.

Last week The Wall Street Journal got an overwhelming viewer response on David Streitfeld’s article Owners Stop Paying Mortgages, and Stop Fretting, which leads me to my point.

Are banks growing desperate and concerned that if people begin to walk a way, this will turn them into toast? I’m afraid so.

Well to make another point. A friend of mine in New York got this letter (below) from Wells Fargo asking them if they want to leave their existing mortgage behind? In return Wells with their “direct transfer option” will let you walk a way with $10,000.00! Basically sign, transfer over the title.

Only there is 34 problems, you see there is a video going around that shows how to Cash Out Before You Dash Out…34 ways to make $39K before giving back the house!

I think Wells Fargo needs to step it up a little. Perhaps they lost your note!

Wells Fargo Letter:

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in Bank Owned, deed in lieu, foreclosure, foreclosures, wells fargoComments (0)

Fannie Offers Spur to Avoid Foreclosure: WSJ

Fannie Offers Spur to Avoid Foreclosure: WSJ


SFF posted how DJSP is going to begin to run the “Deed In Lieu” for an undisclosed servicer. Is this the opening door to fend off the millions of foreclosure fraud that are being presented in many courts?? Is this they’re way of “taking care of business” prior to any foreclosure? Go here to see Law offices of David J. Stern as a retained attorney for Fannie Mae. NOTE: almost all Mills are on this list.

By NICK TIMIRAOS

Fannie Mae will make it easier for some struggling homeowners to buy houses in the future if they avoid foreclosure in the present.

Under rules released this month that will take effect in July, some troubled borrowers who give up their homes by voluntarily transferring ownership through a “deed in lieu of foreclosure” or by completing a short sale, where a home is sold for less than the amount owed, will be eligible in two years to apply for a new mortgage backed by Fannie.

Currently, borrowers who complete a deed-in-lieu of foreclosure must wait four years before they can take out a loan that Fannie is willing to purchase.

[FANNIE]The new policies from Fannie, a government-backed mortgage-finance company that together with Freddie Mac backs about half of the U.S. mortgage market, don’t relax waiting periods for borrowers who go through foreclosure.

In 2008, Fannie lengthened that waiting period to five years from four.

To quality for the reduced waiting period, most borrowers will need to make a down payment of at least 20%, although borrowers with extenuating circumstances, such as a job loss, will be required to put down just 10%.

Even if waiting periods are shortened, many borrowers may be unlikely to repair their credit that quickly in order to get a loan in the first place. Foreclosures and short sales generally have the same effect on a borrower’s credit score and can stay on a credit report for up to seven years.

The new rules are designed to make foreclosure alternatives more attractive to borrowers at a time when the Obama administration is ramping up its effort to encourage banks to consider alternatives such as short sales. That program sets pre-approved terms for short sales and offers financial incentives to borrowers and lenders to complete such sales.

Freddie Mac requires borrowers to wait five years after a foreclosure and four years after a short sale or deed-in-lieu.

Those periods can fall to three years for a foreclosure or two years for a short sale when borrowers show extenuating circumstances.

Officials at the Federal Housing Administration, the government mortgage insurer, say they are considering changes to their rules, which require borrowers with a foreclosure to wait at least three years before becoming eligible for an FHA-backed loan.

“We are beginning to think about post-recession, how you address borrowers who became unemployed through no fault of their own … and now deserve the right to re-enter the housing-finance system,” said FHA Commissioner David Stevens. DinSFLA: DOUBLE DUH! Beginning to think?? A little too late.

But some worry that policies enabling defaulted borrowers to more quickly resume homeownership could encourage more people to default.

“We don’t want to say that there’s a ‘get out of jail’ card during recessions to walk away from your house,” Mr. Stevens said. DinSFLA: Exactly who is getting the “GET OUT OF JAIL CARD”??

In December, the FHA unveiled rules for borrowers who completed a short sale.

Those who have missed payments prior to completing a short sale or who didn’t face a hardship and simply took advantage of declining market conditions to buy a new home must wait three years.

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DJSP Enterprises, Inc. to Handle Processing for National Foreclosure Alternative Program for Leading Mortgage Lender

DJSP Enterprises, Inc. to Handle Processing for National Foreclosure Alternative Program for Leading Mortgage Lender


The PROOF is in coding…Figure this one out! 

DJSP’s Expertise and Comprehensive Electronic Platform Will Expedite Lender’s New, Alternative Foreclosure Initiative

PLANTATION, Fla., April 21 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ — DJSP Enterprises, Inc., (Nasdaq: DJSP) one of the largest providers of processing services for the mortgage and real estate industries in the United States, today announced that it has been selected to process files for a national mortgage lender, one of the country’s top mortgage servicers, to be one of the primary vendors supporting its national foreclosure alternative program.

DJSP will process files for this national mortgage servicer’s national “deed in lieu” initiative, a major component of its foreclosure alternative program, which is designed to help homeowners who are behind in their mortgage payments transition out of their homes without having to go through the foreclosure process.

David Stern, President and CEO of DJSP Enterprises, Inc. adds, “We are extremely excited to be a part of this servicer’s program, an initiative that is seen as a joint effort between homeowners and mortgage lenders to help resolve the nation’s housing crisis. This transition process is viewed by many in the industry as being beneficial to both homeowners and mortgage holders. For the homeowners, it is less damaging to their credit scores, generally relieves them of any deficiencies and allows them to stay in their homes for a transitional period of time. For the mortgage holder, it reduces the legal costs and expedites the transfer process back to them. Ultimately this reduces the carrying costs for our client compared to a foreclosure. In addition, the program includes a provision for relocation assistance provided by the lender to the homeowner. Due to client demand we have moved to aggressively grow this division of our business.”

Mr. Stern concluded, “Because of the quality of services provided to this national mortgage lender for years, they understand and appreciate the level of professionalism and efficiency we bring to all aspects of the financial services business. They also understand that DJSP’s electronic platform is uniquely positioned to underpin this initiative, as it is able to provide the quality of service needed at a reasonable price. Additionally, following the closing of our recently announced agreement to acquire the national title insurance agency, Timios, Inc., we will have the control necessary to meet client deadlines on a consistent basis across the country. Timios will become a wholly owned subsidiary of DJSP, providing title search, document preparation, signing services and title policies on deed in lieu’s nationwide. Expanding our ability to fulfill title and closing services beyond Florida will give us the ability to provide the same high level of service our clients enjoy with us in Florida. We are looking forward to offering this best in class service to other clients in the very near future.”

The closing of the previously announced acquisition of Timios, Inc. is subject to customary due diligence, closing conditions and regulatory approvals.

About DJSP Enterprises, Inc.

DJSP is the largest provider of processing services for the mortgage and real estate industries in Florida and one of the largest in the United States. The Company provides a wide range of processing services in connection with mortgages, mortgage defaults, title searches and abstracts, REO (bank-owned) properties, loan modifications, title insurance, loss mitigation, bankruptcy, related litigation and other services. The Company’s principal customer is the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A. whose clients include all of the top 10 and 17 of the top 20 mortgage servicers in the United States, many of which have been customers for more than 10 years. The Company has approximately 1000 employees and contractors and is headquartered in Plantation, Florida, with additional operations in Louisville, Kentucky and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Company’s U.S. operations are supported by a scalable, low-cost back office operation in Manila, the Philippines that provides data entry and document preparation support for the U.S. operation.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, about DJSP Enterprises, Inc. Forward looking statements are statements that are not historical facts. Such forward-looking statements, based upon the current beliefs and expectations of the Company’s management, are subject to risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ from the forward looking statements. The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements: business conditions, changing interpretations of generally accepted accounting principles; outcomes of government or other regulatory reviews, particularly those relating to the regulation of the practice of law; the impact of inquiries, investigations, litigation or other legal proceedings involving the Company or its affiliates, which, because of the nature of the Company’s business, have happened in the past to the Company and the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A.; the impact and cost of continued compliance with government or state bar regulations or requirements; legislation or other changes in the regulatory environment, particularly those impacting the mortgage default industry; unexpected changes adversely affecting the businesses in which the Company is engaged; fluctuations in customer demand; the Company’s ability to manage rapid growth; intensity of competition from other providers in the industry; general economic conditions, including improvements in the economic environment that slows or reverses the growth in the number of mortgage defaults, particularly in the State of Florida; the ability to efficiently expand its operations to other states or to provide services not currently provided by the Company; the impact and cost of complying with applicable SEC rules and regulation, many of which the Company will have to comply with for the first time after the closing of the business combination; geopolitical events and changes, as well as other relevant risks detailed in the Company’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, (the “SEC”), including its report on Form 20-F for the period ended December 31, 2009, in particular, those listed under “Item 3. Key Information – Risk Factors.” The information set forth herein should be read in light of such risks. The Company does not assume any obligation to update the information contained in this press release.

Company Contact:
David J. Stern
Chairman and CEO
DJSP Enterprises, Inc.
Phone: 954-233-8000
Email: dstern@dstern.com
or
Kumar Gursahaney
Executive Vice President and CFO

DJSP Enterprises, Inc.
Phone: 954-233-8000
Email: kumar@dstern.com
Investor Contact:
Hayden IR

Cameron Donahue
Phone: 651-653-1854
Email: cameron@haydenir.com

SOURCE DJSP Enterprises, Inc.

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FAIR ISAAC CORPORATION aka FICO: Now Worthless…

FAIR ISAAC CORPORATION aka FICO: Now Worthless…


By DinSFLA

Yep, just another way for bankers to rate our credit worthiness. As we  begin to witness all this garbage happening with banks these days, why even bother to save your credit? Save your cash and buy in cash. The higher the credit score the more we are worth to them. It makes no sense what so ever now. We are living our lives based on stupid silly numbers. If you want to purchase a home…go at it and be creative, ask for owner financing.

If we eliminate the banks “middle men” we will learn to live free with no strings attached. Don’t get all strung out because your score has gone way down. It’s only a number!

Keep in mind if you are in an illegal foreclosure you are only 3 months late…The non-creditors that are reporting you have nothing to do with your debt. If you care about this “FICO” score then write your bureau and demand that they delete any derogatory findings the non-creditor has filed with them!

Lets take a look at FICO:

Company milestones

  • 1958: Fair Isaac starts building credit scoring systems.
  • 1970: First credit card scoring system delivered.
  • 1975: First behavior scoring system to predict credit risk related to existing customers.
  • 1981: Introduction of Fair Isaac credit bureau try to scores.
  • 1986: IPO, stock listed at NASDAQ.
  • 1991: Introduction of TRIAD, a credit card management system.
  • 1996: Stock moves from NASDAQ to NYSE.
  • 1997: The American Bankers Association honors Bill Fair and Earl Isaac with Distinguished Service Award for their pioneering work in credit scoring. AHA… you see I knew they were involved some how! Right about the time they were planning our future.
  • 1999, the average FICO score of the top prime issuers of 30-year mortgage pools (privately issued non-GSE mortgage-backed securities) was 721 compared to a 605 average FICO score for subprime issuers of fixed-rate pools.
  • Under another classification, a 580 FICO score has been used to describe the minimum credit score acceptable for “A-minus” credit. Still, the lower grade subprime borrowers are characterized by a history of more delinquencies on their credit obligations. Under one classification, “B” and “C” borrowers can have a minimum FICO score of 540 and may have four late mortgage payments in the past twelve months. See Jess Lederman, Tom Millon, Stacy Ferguson, and Cedric Lewis, “A-minus Breaks Away from Subprime Loan Pack,” in Secondary Market Executive.
  • 2002: Merger with HNC Software, Inc., adding fraud detection to their arsenal with the $100 million Falcon product line and strengthening their analytics offerings in the insurance and telecommunications markets.
  • 2003: Fair, Isaac and Company is renamed Fair Isaac Corporation. Here too …they were on to something.
  • 2004: Acquisition of London Bridge Software, expanding services to credit collections and recovery software. Opens a new analytic consulting and product development center in Bangalore, India targeted primarily at Asia Pacific markets.
  • 2005: Acquisition of RulesPower, bringing Rete III algorithm to Blaze Advisor.
  • 2006: Celebrates 50th anniversary.
  • 2008: Fair Isaac released Debt Manager 7
  • 2009: Company name changed from Fair Isaac, to FICO (FICO means Fair Isaac Corporation). Website changed to fico.com

 

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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