Bank Owned | FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA

Tag Archive | "bank owned"

DECEPTION | Agents advised to keep ‘bank-owned’ quiet

DECEPTION | Agents advised to keep ‘bank-owned’ quiet


Deceptive Practices Lives On: Your agent best tell you this is an REO/Foreclosure or he is in big doo doo. They owe you honesty. Sue their asses big time if you are being deceived.

Just because they are told to do this, the agent must disclose to you any facts.

Palm Beach Post-

Looking to buy a home, but not sure you want one that fell into foreclosure?

Good luck finding out before you tour the property.

It’s a little-known fact that Wells Fargo Bank’s Premier Asset Services division, which sells bank-owned homes, instructs agents who sell these houses to list the owner as “Owner of Record,” and not Wells Fargo. Premier Asset Services also sells homes owned by other banks.

The Multiple Listing Service, which is used by real estate agents to list properties, includes a category for bank-owned property. But here again, agents are told by many banks not to disclose the fact that the property is, in fact, owned by a bank.

A number of agents who sell bank-owned properties privately say most banks have the same requirement. They say banks want their homes to be considered equally with non-distressed homes.

[PALM BEACH POST]

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUDComments (1)

Banks high on list of delinquent property owners, Not certain they even own the homes?

Banks high on list of delinquent property owners, Not certain they even own the homes?


BOSTON GLOBE-

Two of the city’s top delinquent landlords are not landlords at all. They’re banks.

City officials said Wells Fargo & Co. and Bank of America owe more than $80,000 in fines for allowing many vacant properties in foreclosure to fall into disrepair and blight neighborhoods.

Yet both banks, two of the nation’s largest, question whether they are responsible for the properties and tickets. Wells Fargo representatives, for example, said they don’t even know if they own many of the homes; Wells Fargo could be servicing a foreclosure for another bank, or acting as a trustee for a giant pension fund that holds the mortgage.




© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUDComments (1)

Is D-DAY coming to some Banks? More rows of shadow inventory…

Is D-DAY coming to some Banks? More rows of shadow inventory…


Foreclosure Filings on Track to Hit 3 Million Homes. Repos Expected to Reach 1 Million in 2010

by Jann Swanson Mortgage News Daily

Default notices, auction sale notices, and actual bank repossessions were received  on a total of 1,961,894 homes, or one in every 78 households,  during the most recent six month period according to the Mid-Year 2010 U.S Foreclosure Market Report issued by RealtyTrac.

These findings represent a 5 percent decline in filings from the last half of 2009, but an increase of 8 percent from the first half of last year.  Perhaps the good news is that the year-over-year change was almost totally due to a jump in bank repossessions, which were up five percent while default and auction notices were down 10.4 percent since the first half of last year.

In June there were a total of 313,841 filings, a decrease of nearly 3 percent from May and down nearly 7 percent from the previous June.  It was the sixteenth straight month where the total number of properties with foreclosure filings exceeded 300,000.

RealtyTrac’s report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure, unfortunately the mid-year review did not break down the data into individual categories (but we’re building our own spreadsheet).

  1. Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS). This is the first legal notification from a lender that the borrower on a mortgage loan has defaulted under the terms of their mortgage and the lender intends to foreclose unless the loan is brought current.
  2. Auction — Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); If the borrower does not catch up on their payments the lender will file a notice of sale (the lender intends to sell the property). This notice is published in local paper and contains information pertaining to the date, time and subject property address.
  3. Real Estate Owned or REO properties : “REO” stands for “real estate owned” and typically refers to the inventory of real estate that banks and mortgage companies have foreclosed on and subsequently purchased through the foreclosure auction if there was no offer higher than the minimum bid.

During the second quarter of 2010 there were foreclosure filings on 895,521 properties, down from 932,234 in the first quarter, a decrease of 4 percent.  This is 1 percent more filings than in the second quarter one year earlier.

“The second quarter was a tale of two trends,” said James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac. “The pace of properties entering foreclosure slowed as lenders pre-empted or delayed foreclosure proceedings on delinquent properties with more aggressive short sale and loan modification initiatives. Meanwhile the pace of properties completing the foreclosure process through bank repossession quickened as lenders cleared out a backlog of distressed inventory delayed by foreclosure prevention efforts in 2009.

The midyear numbers put us on pace to exceed 3 million properties with foreclosure filings by the end of the year, and more than 1 million bank repossessions,” Saccacio continued. “The roller coaster pattern of foreclosure activity over the past 12 months demonstrates that while the foreclosure problem is being managed on the surface, a massive number of distressed properties and underwater loans continue to sit just below the surface, threatening the fragile stability of the housing market.”

As usual, Nevada, Arizona, Florida, California, and Utah topped the list of states in foreclosure activity.  In Nevada, one in 17 housing units (6 percent) received at least one foreclosure filing in the first six months of the year, down 6.2 percent from a year earlier and 13 percent from the last half of 2009.  In Arizona there were filings posted against one in 30 housing units, down 1.6 percent from the second half of 2009 and 1.88 year over year.  Florida follows with one in 32 homes in some stage of foreclosure, a decrease of 8.61 from the most recent half year and an increase of 3.4 percent from one year ago.

Other states with foreclosure rates ranking among the nation’s 10 highest were California (1 in 39 units), Utah (1 in 52), Georgia (1 in 56), Michigan (1 in 58), Idaho (1 in 59), Illinois (1 in 62), and Colorado (1 in 72.)

These were the thoughts MND shared regarding the May data. They are still very relevant…

Plain and Simple: The good news is it seems like the worst is behind us in terms of new defaults. Plus the modest decline in newly scheduled auctions helps out housing on the excess supply front as banks are choosing to hold onto their inventory instead of flood the market with distressed supply (which would drive prices even lower). Perhaps this is a factor of the expiration of the homebuyer tax credit? Now for the bad news. Over the past year, to give HAMP a chance to “work its magic” (which servicers have little incentive to do ) and to reduce the cost of maintaining the condition of foreclosed properties, banks were delaying the foreclosed home liquidation process. This allowed delinquent borrowers to stay in their houses and also allowed banks to avoid asset value write-downs. Unfortunately, with HAMP running out of qualified borrowers, that trend is starting to reverse course. Bank balance sheets are beginning to balloon with REO, shadow inventory is being converted to actual inventory!

This is a negative for two reasons. First it implies more people are being put out of their home and onto the street and second, at some point, the distressed homes banks are adding to their balance sheets will need to be put back up for sale. Once the housing market starts to pick up recovery momentum, banks will begin to slowly liquidate their inventory of foreclosed properties. Hopefully they will do so in a manner that does not greatly disrupt local supply/demand and push prices even lower (which would hurt their own cause). Growing “shadow inventory” is one of two reasons why the housing recovery will likely be a very long process (the other being long term unemployment).

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in Bank Owned, foreclosure, foreclosures, shadow foreclosures, STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUDComments (0)

The bank took my house and killed my children

The bank took my house and killed my children


On June 24, PACT, CCISCO and the PICO National Network hosted a U.S. Treasury Hearing with 500 community members to urge Policy Director Laurie Maggiano: Treasury must do more to hold banks accountable for modifying loans to keep families in their homes. Tax payers bailed out the big banks, and now they need to be a part of stopping preventable foreclosures and rebuilding the economy.

Treasury is responsible for implementing President Obama’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) that promised to help 3-4 million homeowners avoid foreclosure. Fewer than 10% of these homeowners have received permanent loan modifications. We are working to change that!

Treasury Policy Director Laurie Maggiano agreed to:
• Make the program more inclusive of homeowners in need of loan modifications.
• Get back to PACT in writing within 30 days after taking all the stories, research, and demands for change back to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner.

CAN YOU FEEL the ANGER? ….I DID!

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in hamp, Mortgage Foreclosure Fraud, mortgage modificationComments (0)

QUEENS have shadows too

QUEENS have shadows too


Now, if this is only a piece of the American Pie that was created…Imagine this is a fraction of the 8 million waiting in the shadow foreclosure inventory looming in the highest states such as Arizona, California, Florida etc. Sellers need to price their homes aggressively or risk losing to these shadows.

In my opinion what these banks are doing now is committing fraud. Why? Because they are not disclosing this inventory and are making loans to unsuspecting buyers when they know for a FACT the values are still heading south!

A Housing Price Collapse in Queens New York Is Almost Certain

Keith Jurow

Posted by Keith Jurow 06/21/10 8:00 AM EST

Many commentators continue to describe the housing market in Queens as surprisingly resilient.  Hardly any has warned of a possible collapse.  Is this a disservice to both sellers and buyers?  Let’s take a close look and see.

Introduction to the Queens Housing Market

The borough of Queens in New York City has a population of roughly 2.2 million.  For nearly a century, it has been the bastion of the middle class in the Big Apple.  To put things in perspective, you could have bought a nice two-story attached brick house in south Queens for $16,000 in 1950.  Twenty-five years later, the cost of this same house was still under $30,000.

That began to change as inflation soared into double digits in the late 1970s. At the start of the new millennium, the median price of home sales in Queens had climbed to roughly $168,000 according to trulia.com.  During the bubble years of 2003-2006, home sales soared in Queens and throughout New York City (NYC).  Prices really skyrocketed.

Between 1996 and 2006, the annual number of first lien purchase mortgages originated in NYC more than doubled.  Citywide, a record of more than 50,000 owner-occupied homes were sold in 2006.  That year, the median size of a first lien purchase mortgage climbed to $384,000 according to the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy.  That nice brick house in south Queens actually sold in 2005 for a whopping $360,000.

As we saw in a previous REAL ESTATE CHANNEL article, the mortgage problem was exacerbated by the growing use of piggyback second liens to cover the 15-20% of the purchase price which the first mortgage did not.  In 2006, 28% of all New York City buyers took out piggyback seconds.  The Furman Center found that 43% of purchasers with incomes from $100,000 to $150,000 used a piggyback second mortgage.

According to trulia, home sales in Queens soared to a record of more than 20,000 in 2005.  The following year, the median price of all existing homes sold reached roughly $500,000.

While most bubble housing markets weakened in 2006 and then plunged in 2007-2008, the NYC market remained relatively robust because of the roaring stock market.  But quite unnoticed, sales volume began declining.  After the stock market peaked in the summer of 2007, the housing market began to unravel.

The Looming Default Disaster in Queens

According to RealtyTrac.com, as of June 16 there were 9,054 Queens residences which the banks had placed into default since the middle of February 2009.  Of these, 2,550 have been in default for more than a year.  None has been foreclosed by the banks yet.  Every one of these owners who is occupying the property has been living basically rent-free since stopping the mortgage payment.

More than 4,000 of these homes have outstanding mortgage debts in excess of $400,000.  Over 2,500 have mortgage liens of more than $500,000.

When RealtyTrac is unable to obtain the outstanding mortgage debt figure, it lists the amount for which the owner is in arrears.  Here is the real shocker.  More than 3,500 properties have arrearages listed, some as high as $100,000.  Roughly 280 of these owners owe anywhere from $25,000 to $100,000 in delinquent mortgage payments.  Those with arrearages of roughly $100,000 have not paid a cent to the lender in about three years.  Nice deal isn’t it?  Let’s not feel too sorry for these poor folks.

Without a doubt, the word has spread throughout Queens that the banks are not foreclosing on owners who stop making mortgage payments.  It is not very surprising, then, that an incredible 11.2% of all borrowers are now delinquent in their payments by 60 days or more.  This figure comes from Trans Union, the credit-reporting firm, which puts out a quarterly mortgage delinquency study based on a database of 27 million anonymous credit reports.  That is up from only 7.2% a year earlier.  The chart below shows how the serious delinquency rate has skyrocketed in the last three years.

queens-mortgage-06212010-chart.jpg

How many delinquent owners are we talking about?  The borough has roughly 250,000 single-family homes and another 240,000 units in 2-4 family houses owned by investors.  Even assuming that roughly 1/3 of these owners are mortgage-free, at least 25,000 properties are seriously delinquent now.  We know from Core Logic’s monthly mortgage report that nearly all of these seriously delinquent borrowers will eventually default.  That is 25,000 additional properties which will eventually have to be foreclosed and repossessed by the banks.  Meanwhile, they are living rent-free and pocketing perhaps $3,000-$4,000 a month.  Investors who own 2-4 family houses may also still be collecting rent.  Sort of makes your blood boil, doesn’t it?

What About the Foreclosed Properties Owned by the Banks?

You would think that with so many delinquent and defaulted homeowners in Queens, there would now be a huge number of homes owned by the banks and sitting in their inventory (REOs).  Wrong.

RealtyTrac showed a total of only 1,389 homes in the banks’ repossessed inventory as of June 16.  Nearly 400 have an outstanding mortgage debt exceeding $500,000.  Dozens of these properties have been owned by the banks for more than two years.

You may have read something lately about how banks nationwide are unloading their REOs at a faster pace now.  Not in Queens.  RealtyTrac lists a total of 12 properties which the banks have up for sale now.  That’s right – 12.  Why only twelve?  Who knows?  The banks are clearly concerned that if they dump too many of their REOs onto a housing market that is now so thin, this will severely depress prices.  They would also have to write down the actual losses on their balance sheet.

What is the State of the Housing Market Now in Queens?

As of June 16, Trulia listed 12,777 properties for sale.  Of these, 672 were added in the previous seven days.  The average listing price was $438,000.

Are homes selling now in Queens?  Hardly.  According to MDA DataQuick, which culls its figures from county recorder offices, the median price of all new and existing single-family homes and condos sold in the first quarter of 2010 was $403,000.  That isn’t too bad a drop from the peak, right?  The problem is that only 1420 new and existing single-family properties were sold during this latest quarter.  That is an average of only 473 per month.  We are talking about a county with 2.2 million people and nearly 500,000 housing units (excluding multi-family apartment buildings).

By way of comparison, let’s take a look at Houston with a population slightly smaller than Queens.  According to the Houston Association of Realtors, sales of all existing homes in the Greater Houston area in May totaled 6,659.  Why such a difference?  Simple.  The median price of Houston sales was only $155,000.

With the market in Queens so awful, are home sellers cutting their asking price?  Not really.  Trulia reveals that only 24% of all homes listed there now have had the asking price dropped by the owner since being posted on the website.  That seems crazy, doesn’t it?  True, some of these owners are probably not what we might call serious sellers.  They don’t have to sell and are just “testing the waters.”

What about those who either really want to sell their home or are distressed and must sell the property?  Don’t they need to lower their asking price, perhaps substantially, in order to find a buyer?  Absolutely.

Even more important, what happens when the banks start putting into default the 25,000 seriously delinquent homeowners and foreclosing on the 9,000+ properties currently in default?  This overhang waits like a potential tsunami that we know will follow when an earthquake measuring 9.1 erupts underwater as it did in late 2004.

Sooner or later, the banks will have to begin whittling down the growing number of delinquent and defaulted properties in Queens.  What will happen to prices when the banks finally start to place this potentially enormous REO inventory on the market?  Simple.  Prices will plunge.  Make no mistake, it will be ugly.

Those who currently have their home on the market in Queens need to see what’s coming down the road.  If they refuse to lower their asking price substantially, they will almost certainly regret that decision in the next year or two.  Furthermore, prospective buyers probably ought to seriously consider whether waiting might be the more prudent course of action.

To a lesser extent, this analysis also applies to the three other outlying boroughs of Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Staten Island.

Posted in Bank Owned, concealment, conspiracy, CONTROL FRAUD, foreclosure, foreclosure fraud, foreclosures, Real EstateComments (2)

Townhouse for sale…but with a catch

Townhouse for sale…but with a catch


Listen up Real Estate agents as you are well too familiar with this tale.

Previously I wrote a post  ARE FORECLOSURE MILLS Coercing Buyers for BANK OWNED homes? ARE ALL THE MILLS? and just today I received another example of these foreclosure mills working hand in hand as title companies demanding you use their terms or else get NO CONTRACT.

Here is the example of this agent from Coldwell Banker who clearly states

“FannieMaeHomePath-Purchase this property for as little as 3% down. This property approved for HomePath Mortgage Financing. Approved for HomePath Renovation Mortgage Financing. Large 3 bedroom unit with two full baths. 2nd floor master suite has hardwood floors and a huge closet. Upgraded kitchen has granite countertops and cherry wood cabinets. Laundry Room.  Fenced yard for added privacy.”

“REO Addendum not furnished until acceptance-See IMPORTANT attachments & Follow**Use FAR9 Contract-No Calls Please- EMAIL only: UNIT HAS NO APPLIANCES.”

Well here’s the catch, I got a sneak peek…read the last few sentences to discover the major RESPA VIOLATION among other serious issues.

I am sure Coldwell Banker would be estatic to see agents working in this fashion as well as Fannie Mae having their addendum crossed out in certain areas.

[ipaper docId=33202164 access_key=key-kovwb3di6vj5wqfk52w height=600 width=600 /]


RELATED STORY:

AGENTS BEWARE! HERE COME THE HAFA VENDORS aka LPS AFTER YOUR COMMISSION

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in coercion, concealment, conspiracy, CONTROL FRAUD, djsp enterprises, foreclosure, foreclosure fraud, foreclosure mills, foreclosures, Law Offices Of David J. Stern P.A., law offices of Marshall C. Watson pa, respa, ViolationsComments (0)

ARE FORECLOSURE MILLS Coercing Buyers for BANK OWNED homes? ARE ALL THE MILLS?

ARE FORECLOSURE MILLS Coercing Buyers for BANK OWNED homes? ARE ALL THE MILLS?


MASTER_OFFER_PACKET_03-10-2010[1][1]

In the Master Packet above go to Page 7

Below is from an ad in Trulia

fannie mae owned.bank property. property is vacant.all offers requiring financing must have preapproval letter.all cash offer require proof of fund(see attachement).this property is eligible for home path renovation mortgage-as little as 3% down.buyer must close with seller closing agent(david j. stern law offices,p.a).investors not eligible for first 15days.*for showing instr please read broker remarks* note:offers must be submitted using attachment.close by 30 june and receive extra 3.5% in closing cost

Looking further into this I noticed the following:

  • Still in the name of the owner
  • NOT named under any REO
  • Home last sold for 245K
  • Now listed at 120K

Here is the BIGGEST:

I found a Bank-owned packet for this “SPECIALLY SELECTED” Agent/BROKER in many other REO’s and in this package it states the following: (SEE ABOVE LINK PACKET)

9) Which title companies are the sellers and who do I make out the earnest money deposit to once offer is verbally accepted?

a. PLEASE LOOK ON MLX REMARKS FOR TITLE COMPANY. MLX WILL HAVE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:
i. David Stern, P.A.
ii. Marshall C. Watson, P.A.
iii. Smith, Hiatt, & Diaz, P.A.
iv. Butler & Hosch, P.A.
v. Shapiro & Fishman, P.A.
vi. Spear & Hoffman, P.A.
vii. Adorno & Yoss, P.A.
viii. Watson Title

ix. New House Title (This is registered with FDLG address 9119 CORPORATE LAKE DRIVE, SUITE 300 TAMPA FL 33634)

10) Can the buyer use their own title company or must they use the title company selected by seller?

a. The buyer MUST HOLD ESCROW with Fannie Mae Title Company as stated on MLX.

NOW are we unleashing another dimension to this never ending SAGA?

We recently found out about WTF!!! DJSP Enterprises, Inc. Announces Agreement to Acquire Timios, Inc., Expand Presence Into 38 States , so is this a way for the Mills to Monopolize on the sales of these properties??

HERE IS same Agent/Broker for a FLORIDA DEFAULT LAW GROUP property:

THIS IS FANNIE MAE HOMEPATH PROPERTY.BANK OWNED.ALL OFFERS REQUIRING FINANCING MUST HAVE PREAPPROVAL LETTER. ALL CASH OFFERS REQUIRE PROOF OF FUNDS. THIS PROPERTY IS APPROVED FOR HOMEPATH AND HOMEPATH RENOVATION MORTGAGE FINANCING-AS LITTLE AS 3% DOWN,NO APPRAISAL OR MORTGAGE INSURANCE REQUIRED! ** FOR SHOWING INST PLEASE READ BROKER REMARKS** YOU MUST SUBMIT OFFER USING ATTACHMENT! INVESTORS NOT ELIGIBLE FOR FIRST 15DAYS.CLOSE BY JUNE 30 TO BE ELIGIBLE FOR EXTRA 3.5% SC. EMD: FL DEFAULT LAW GROUP.

Here is another same Agent/Broker for MARSHALL C. WATSON property:

FANNIE MAE OWNED.BANK PROPERTY. PROPERTY IS VACANT.ALL OFFERS REQUIRING FINANCING MUST HAVE PREAPPROVAL LETTER.ALL CASH OFFERS REQUIRE PROOF OF FUNDS(SEE ATTACHEMENT).THIS PROPERTY IS ELIGIBLE FOR HOME PATH RENOVATION MORTGAGE-AS LITTLE AS 3% DOWN.BUYER MUST CLOSE WITH SELLER CLOSING AGENT (LAW OFFICES OF MARSHALL C. WATSON).INVESTOR NOT ELIGIBLE FOR FIRST 15DAYS.*FOR SHOWING INSTR PLEASE READ BROKER REMARK* NOTE:OFFERS MUST BE SUBMITTED USING ATTACHMENT.CLOSE BY JUNE 30 TO GET 3.5% EXTRA IN CLOSING COST

Does the JUNE 30th Closing Day have any significance??

MAYBE it’s because of this? MERS May NOT Foreclose for Fannie Mae effective 5/1/2010I am just trying to make sense of this…Is there a grace period that followed?

  • What “if” the BUYER selects their own Title company? Does this eliminate their chances of ever even being considered as a buyer?
  • Why even bother to state this?
  • Is this a way for the selected Agent/ Broker to find the buyer and discourage other agents or buyers from viewing?
  • Was this at all even necessary to state?
  • Is this verbiage to coerce agents to get a higher commission rather than pass down the incentive of 3.5% towards closing cost “if” under contract by 6/30?
  • Why do investors have to refrain from buying for the first 15 days?

Coercion (pronounced /ko???r??n/) is the practice of forcing another party to behave in an involuntary manner (whether through action or inaction) by use of threats, intimidation, trickery, or some other form of pressure or force. Such actions are used as leverage, to force the victim to act in the desired way. Coercion may involve the actual infliction of physical pain/injury or psychological harm in order to enhance the credibility of a threat. The threat of further harm may lead to the cooperation or obedience of the person being coerced. Torture is one of the most extreme examples of coercion i.e. severe pain is inflicted until the victim provides the desired information.

RELATED STORY:

LENDER PROCESSING SERVICES (LPS) BUYING UP HOMES AT AUCTIONS? Take a look to see if this address is on your documents!

© 2010-15 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in butler & hosch pa, conspiracy, djsp enterprises, fannie mae, FDLG, florida default law group, foreclosure, foreclosure fraud, foreclosure mills, hiatt & diaz PA, insider, investigation, Law Offices Of David J. Stern P.A., law offices of Marshall C. Watson pa, marshall watson, MERS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., Mortgage Foreclosure Fraud, new house title llc, Real Estate, REO, securitization, shapiro & fishman pa, short sale, spear & hoffmanComments (4)

KNBC Segment on LA City Ordinance to Hold Banks Accountable for Abandoned Foreclosures

KNBC Segment on LA City Ordinance to Hold Banks Accountable for Abandoned Foreclosures


EVERY STATE SHOULD TAKE NOTICE!

I wonder what this will do to investor shares?? Did they read their prospectus? I hope they did!

Or… they can SCAM FHA Subprime buyers to take out a FHA 203K loan?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1YGgvZkLYYY]

Posted in foreclosureComments (0)


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