April, 2012 | FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA

Archive | April, 2012

Strategic defaults continue to rise in U.S.

Strategic defaults continue to rise in U.S.

This is what will do the banks in… Payback will be a bitch!

KSL-

Considered a viable strategy for managing troubled assets in an era of high unemployment, record foreclosures and government bailouts, millions of Americans are considering strategic defaults.

With almost 12 million mortgages underwater, a growing number of homeowners are simply walking away from the places they call home.

Strategic defaults, also known as strategic foreclosures, often take mortgage lenders by surprise because homeowners generally have had excellent credit histories and have previously met all their other financial obligations.

One of the distinguishing factors between a strategic default and other mortgage defaults is that the strategic default is a deliberate business decision. The homeowner has the ability to make payments but simply decides not to because the property value is less than the balance owed on the mortgage.

[KSL]

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD1 Comment

Alison Frankel: How BofA could lose big if it wins MBIA regulatory challenge

Alison Frankel: How BofA could lose big if it wins MBIA regulatory challenge

Alison Frankel’s On The Case-

I’ve spent a lot of time talking about what I consider Bank of America’s risky gamesmanship in its multi-pronged litigation with the bond insurer MBIA, but it may be that I’ve underestimated that risk by focusing on the downside for the bank in MBIA’s breach of contract and fraud suit. Under a not-implausible scenario, BofA faces serious risk in its regulatory challenge to MBIA’s transformation that’s going to trial on May 14. And ironically, the risk comes not from losing the case — but from winning it.

According to a sophisticated and well-advised MBIA institutional investor that has devoted serious resources to analyzing the issue — trust me, even though the investor doesn’t want to broadcast its involvement, this is a seriously savvy player — if Bank of America and two French banks succeed in overturning MBIA’s 2009 split into separate muni bond and structured finance businesses, there’s a reasonable likelihood that BofA could wind up at the back of the line of MBIA claimants, waiting years for whatever scraps are left over from payouts to municipal bond insurance policyholders.

Here’s why. For all sorts of reasons…

[REUTERS ON THE CASE]

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD0 Comments

FULL DEPOSITION TRANSCRIPT OF AURORA BANK FSB ASST. VICE PRESIDENT NEVA HALL

FULL DEPOSITION TRANSCRIPT OF AURORA BANK FSB ASST. VICE PRESIDENT NEVA HALL

Read With Care… because almost all banks/servicers use the same LPS – Fidelity systems. 🙂

6 Q Tell me about the actual act of signing these
7 affidavits. When you received them from the person who
8 distributes the documents, would they come to you in
9 physical form?
10 A Yes.
11 Q Okay. And would there be one or a stack of
12 them, or how would they come to you?
13 A It could be either.
14 Q Okay. Was it more common than not to get more
15 than one?
16 A No.
17 Q Was there a certain time of day those would be
18 delivered to you?
19 A I usually got them in the morning.
20 Q Would the notary be right there with you?
21 A No.
22 Q Where was the notary?
23 A On the same floor, in the same area.
24 Q So the notary would not watch you sign the
25 document?

1 A No.

[…]

20 Q Tell me about the LPS Fidelity system. Is
21 that one system or are those — is that one title for
22 the same system?
23 A Actually, LPS owns or has both systems. They
24 have the Fidelity system and the LPS desktop management
25 system.

1 Q And in your course of sending affidavits
2 sometimes you would consult both of those or one of
3 those?
4 A Yes. Primarily the — our system of record.
5 Q The desktop?
6 A No.
7 Q Or the Fidelity?
8 A The Fidelity.
9 Q What can you tell me about the Fidelity
10 system? Does that have the entire payment history?
11 A Yes.

[…]

10 Q Would Fidelity have — besides the full
11 payment history, what other kinds of things would be on
12 the Fidelity system?
13 A The date the note was signed, the origination
14 balance, the principal balance, the date of default —
15 or actually the contractual due date because it’s not
16 always defaulted.
17 Q Anything else?
18 A In bankruptcy we had to post petition due
19 date; the contractual payment and any pending payment
20 changes; the escrow information.
21 Q What about servicing notes, would that be on
22 the Fidelity system?
23 A Yes.
24 Q Now, besides those, anything else?
25 A Yeah, there’s a lot of information on

1 Fidelity. I wouldn’t be able to name it all.
2 Q You said Fidelity contains the date the note
3 was signed; is that right?
4 A Yes.
5 Q Does it contain actual copies?
6 A Not in Fidelity, no.
7 Q Okay. So, in other words, so we are clear,
8 you wouldn’t click on Fidelity to look at a copy of the
9 note; is that right?
10 A No. We have a different system that does
11 that.

[…]

4 Q Okay. What’s in the LPS desktop management
5 system?
6 A Communication to the law firms.

[…]

19 Q Okay. Besides correspondence and besides the
20 milestones, anything else on the LPS desktop management
21 system?
22 MR. ELLISON: Object to the form.
23 You can answer.
24 MR. ZACKS: What’s wrong with the form?
25 MR. ELLISON: She didn’t say, correspondence.

1 She said, communications to law firms.
2 BY MR. ZACKS:
3 Q You can answer.
4 A Yeah, they have documents in that — either
5 documents from us or we would get documents from them
6 through LPS.
7 Q From?
8 A The law firm.
9 Q And by “law firm,” you’re talking about
10 outside foreclosure counsel; is that right?
11 A Correct.
12 Q Or could it be any other kind of counsel, or
13 bankruptcy counsel?
14 A Yes.

[…]

9 Q On the Fidelity system, you said that would
10 contain all the payment records, right?
11 A Yes.
12 Q Would that contain payment records from
13 previous servicers, if there were any?
14 A I don’t think so.
15 Q Where would those records be?
16 A They are in a separate — they’re stored
17 separately.
18 Q Is it a separate database system?
19 A Yeah.
20 Q Okay.
21 A Yes.
22 Q What’s that?
23 A I think it’s called Doctrak.
24 Q Doctrak?
25 A D-O-C-T-R-A-K.

[…]

1 Q In your course of signing affidavits of
2 indebtedness, did you ever review the Doctrack system?
3 A No.
4 Q Who is in charge of maintaining the Doctrack
5 system?
6 A I don’t know.
7 Q Who is in charge of the standards in audits
8 for the Doctrak system?
9 A I don’t know.

[…]

24 Q Do you receive anything else from Amber,
25 besides the affidavit itself?

1 A Receive any?
2 Q Sure. She drops off an affidavit on your
3 desk, right?
4 A Yes.
5 Q Is there anything else, along with that
6 affidavit, that she would normally drop off for you?
7 A I don’t understand what you’re asking me. I
8 don’t know what —
9 Q Sure. Would she drop off, you know, the
10 origination file attached to the affidavit, or —
11 A No.
12 Q Would there be anything attached to that
13 affidavit?
14 A Sometimes the — no. I would just be
15 speculating. I don’t remember.
16 Q Along with the affidavit, would there be any
17 specific instructions for you to sign or review or
18 anything like that?
19 A No.
20 Q Just the affidavit itself?
21 A Yes.

[…]

10 Q Okay. And did you — and you’ve already said
11 you wouldn’t check to see if Fannie Mae or Freddie owned
12 that loan, right?
13 A No.
14 Q Okay. Would you check to see if anybody else
15 owned that loan?
16 A No.
17 Q Do you know if anyone did?
18 A I don’t know.
19 Q Did you ever verify a complaint that had a
20 count that said a note was lost?
21 A Yes.
22 Q Okay. And did you look for the note yourself?
23 A No.
24 Q Did you talk to anyone about looking for the
25 note?

1 A No.
2 Q What did you do to verify that a note was lost
3 or misplaced?
4 A Not usually anything.

[…]

7 Q You don’t need special permission to see who
8 the owner or investor is, right?
9 A Correct.
10 Q Would you look at any internal servicing
11 records to determine who the owner or investor was prior
12 to signing affidavits of indebtedness?
13 A Not always, no.
14 Q Okay. Ever?
15 A I can’t say.

Click PDF to Continue to the Full Deposition

Down Load PDF of This Case

Want to know what LPS does when they have the wrong entity? Read The Internal Leaked Emails

 

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD2 Comments

COMPLAINT: Abeel v. Bank of America, etc., et al. | Home Owners Across the Nation Sue All Bank Servicers and Their Offshore Havens

COMPLAINT: Abeel v. Bank of America, etc., et al. | Home Owners Across the Nation Sue All Bank Servicers and Their Offshore Havens

UPDATE & DISCLOSURE:

This lawsuit involves Mitchell Stein’s Law Firm Spire Law Group, LLP. Mr. Stein has been sued by CA AG Kamala Harris.

Current Status via State Bar of California:  Not eligible to practice law (Not Entitled)

H/T DeadlyClear

Take a deep breath and release…

 

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NEW YORK
COUNTY OF NEW YORK

 DEBORAH ABEEL, RICK ADAMS,
ROBERT AKASHI, JIMMY ALAURIA,
DEBBIE EDITH ALEGRIA, IZAIDA
ALTAMIRANO, ROBERTA ALVAREZ,
PATRICIA ALVERT, FATIMA APONTE,
MANUEL ARECHIGA JR, SCOTT
ARMSTRONG, LAURA AUPPERLE,
JOSE P. AYALA, ALEX BACARON,
WILLIAM BARBER, PHILIP BARR,
FRANCISCO BARRIOS, TOM BEINAR,
ANDREW BELCHER, MIRTHA BERNES,
NASSAR BEY, MARK BLANCO, JOHN
BOBEK, ELINOR BOZZONE,
LAWRENCE BRACCO, NATHAN
BREHM, KIM BRIDGES, MIKE BRIGGS,
ERENSTINE BRINKLEY, VICKIE
BROCK, DEXTER BROWN, DIANE
BROWN, LINDA BURGER, BONNIE
BUTTERWORTH, JESSICA CABASAL,
CARLA CALER, PAUL CAMPAGNA,
HARRY CAMPBELL, IRENE CARDENAS,
MARIA CARINO, JON CARLSON,
DINORAH CARMENATE, JUAN
CARRILLO, JAQUELINE CARROLL,
JOSE Z. CASTRO, PAUL CATER, ELOY
CERTEZA, GEOFFREY CHARLTON,
MARK CHASTEEN, VIPIN
CHATURVEDI, RAQUEL CHAVEZ,
RITO CHAVEZ, ANTONIO CHAVEZ,
KEVIN CHEEK, WILLIAM CHIN,
MEHRDAD CHITSAZ, HECTOR
CIBRIAN, RENATA CIRCEO,
ELIZABETH CLAMPET, STEPHEN
CLARKE, CHRISTOPHER COCKRELL,
DANIELLE COCKRELL, GEOFFREY
COCKRELL, LUISE COHEN, OLGA L.
COLLAZO, ROLANDO COLLAZO,
ARTEMIO CONCEPCION, KAT
CONWAY, RUTH CORONA, LUIS
COSIO, PATRICIA CRESPO, MARGO
CRUZ, MARIA CRUZ, OCTAVIO CRUZ,
WILLIAM CUBIAS, JOSE CUESTA,
DONNA DALTON, MARIA DE LA PAZ
JIMENEZ, LOURDES RUIZ DE LA
TORRE, CELON D. DENNIS, DOUGLAS
DENT, CHRISTIAN DIAZ, MARTHA
DIAZ, NICHOLAS DIETEL, JEFFREY
DIXON, IRA DORFMAN, PATRICIA
DOWLING, DANIEL DWYER, JAMES
EBLEN, GLEN ENG, PATRICIA
ESPINOSA, ALICIA FAJARDO, CLOVIS
FEARON, ALBERTINA FIGUEROA,
ROBERTO FIGUEROA, JOSEPH
FITZGERALD, CAROL FLEMMING,
COREY FLINN, LEONARDO FLORES,
ALAN FOGELSTROM, NORMA
FOGELSTROM, DONNA FOOTE, JULIE
FRALEY, DENNIS FROST, CHRISTOPHE
FRUCTUS, SUSAN GALLAGHER, LIDIA
GARCIA, SIMONA GARCIA, JOE
GARCIA, TRACI GEHM, PHILLIP
GENOVESE, BARBARA GIBBS, JAMES
GILBERT, BRADLEY GIPOLAN,
DENNIS GLEASON, TOMMY GLOVER,
CARLOS GONZALES, MARIA
GONZALES, NELSON A. GONZALEZ,
NELSON J. GONZALEZ, CHRISTOPHER
GROSSMAN, DIANE GRUBIC, WALTER
GRUBIC, NESTOR GUILLEN, WILLIAM
GUTIERREZ, ENRIQUE GUZMAN,
MAGA GUZMAN, MARIA GUZMAN,
ALLISON HANSON, JOHN HANSON,
THOMAS HERBST, JORGE L.
HERNANDEZ, MARCELLA
HERNANDEZ, MIGUEL HERNANDEZ,
DAVID HERRON, SESSING HEWITT,
LISA HIGGENS, NANCY HOLCOMBE,
VIRGINIA HOSKING, VINCE HUBBARD,
KELVIN HURDLE, MICHELLE
HURTADO, ART ITURBE, ATHENA
JACKSON, MARIA DE LA PAZ JIMENEZ,
HARLENE JOHNSON, PORTIA JOSEPH,
JEROME KAMINS, JENNIFER KAUER,
DAN KLEIN, NANCY KRANTZ,
MORGAN LAWLEY, BOBBIE LEONARD,
MARK C. LILLY, MIROSLAVA
LITTERDRAGT, DOUGLAS LIZARDI,
DINORAH LLANES, ROSALINDA
LOCKHART, THOMAS LOCKHART,
ALAN LOCKLEAR, MARIA DOLORES
LOMBERA, MOISES LOPEZ, ANGEL
LOPEZ, MOISES LOPEZ, DELORES
LUCAS, BURT LUND, MAE LUND,
ALEJANDRO LUZARDO, RONNIE
LYLES, BRYAN LYNCH, JOSEPH K
LYONS, BRUCE MACBRIDE, ANITA
MACHADO, TANYA MACHADO,
STELLA MARKLEY, TERESA
MARQUEZ, LUIS MARTINEZ, PATRICK
MARTINEZ, CHARLOTTE MCARDLE,
SAOVANNI MEAS, DANIEL MELENDEZ,
GLORIA MELO, MARGARITA MILAM,
MARIE MILLER, AARON MIR, ARLYN
MIR, JASON MOEDING, VERONICA
MONTERRUBIO, ERIK MUMFORD,
ANTONIO MUNOZ, CARMEN MUNOZ,
CINDY MURRILLO, JUAN CARLOS
MURRILLO, JOE NAVARRO, CRISTINA
NAVARRO, MICAH NEELY, RICHARD
NEELY, JONIQUE GARCIA, ERNESTO
NEPOMUCENO, CATHERINE NUTT,
SENEN OCHOA, TALIA OLIVERA,
CHRISTINA ORNELAS, KAROL
OUSLEY, FRANK PACHECO,
ARMANDO PADILLA, ANGELA
PARADA, RUBEN PARRA, EUGENE
PATERRA, ALTINA PATRICK, ROLAND
PERKINS, RAUL PERNETT, MICHAEL
PHILLIPS, LESLIE POLLACK, THOMAS
POUPARD, CARTER POWELL, MERY
QUINTANA, MERLE RAGAN, DANIEL
RAMIREZ, FRANCISCO RAMIREZ,
ANGELICA RAMIREZ, KAIVALYA
RAWAL, JOE REID, SILVIA RENDON,
JOSE REYES, MICHAEL RICCIARDI,
MARJORIE RICHARDSON, DAVE
RICHMAN, CONNIE RICOTTA, EDDIE
RIVERA, GARY ROBERTS,
HERMELINDO ROCHA – VARGAS,
GUIDO RODRIGUEZ, MARTHA
RODRIGUEZ, NANCY P. RODRIGUEZ,
PAUL RODRIGUEZ, ENRIQUE ROMERO,
MICHAEL ROMERO, SHERRIE SAFKO,
LILY SALAS, GUADALUPE SANCHEZ,
HILDA SANCHEZ, JAIME SANCHEZ,
ROGER SANCHEZ, ANTONIO SANCHEZ,
HECTOR SANCHEZ, MARIA SANCHEZ,
SUSAN SANDERS, RUBEN SANTIAGO,
JOSE SAUCEDO, VICKIE SCHETRITT,
ROBERT SCHMALFELDT, JOSE
ALFREDO SEGOVIA, SHERYL SEIMMONTOYA,
ARVIN SERRANO,
MARGARITA SHEA, KENNETH
SIMONSEN, CHARLES SMITH,
CRAYTON SMITH, ROBERT SMITH,
ZENAIDA SMITH, JAMES SNYDER,
VALORIE SNYDER, ILIANA SORENSEN,
ROSARIO MARIA SOTO, DAVID
STARKEY, DEL STAUDINGER,
ANDREW STOLZ, PAUL STROHECKER,
RICHARD STRUNK, LIDIA TAPIA,
DELANE TARRA, MANUEL TAVARES,
MARIA TAVARES, ROBERT TAYLOR,
JOHN TEDESCO, EVA THIELK, JOSA
TIRADO, MAILIN TOMLINSON, TONY
TRUJILLO, JODI TUFT, JEFF TURNER,
MALCOLM TURNER, RITA UCHEKA,
HUGO URRIBARRI, MITCH VAN
MECHELEN, HERMELINDO VARGAS,
THEREISI VILLARUZ, DONALD VITAK
II, MARGUERITE VITA-MATUZOLA,
GARY WAGGY, CARROLL WALTERS,
ARTHUR WEAVER JR., TRACY WEBER,
KENNETH WEINER, GUNTER
WEISSMANN, CLINT WEST, NIKKI
WHITE, ACHINI WHITE, MICHAEL
WIEDERHOLD, GEORGE WILCOX,
PAUL WILDER, DEBRA WILSON, JON
WITHROW, PETER WRIGHT, PHILIP
WRIGHT, JAMES YOCUM, ALEX
ZAETS, LUIS ZAVALA, GEORGE K.
ZINK, REBECCA ABAD, THOMAS
ADLER, BIBIAN AFABLE, MICHAEL
AKIN, SUREN ALAVERDYAN, DORA
ALDRETE, KARL AMRINE, ELMER
ANDERSON, ERIC ANDERSON,
PAMELA ANDERSON, SABRINA
ANDERSON, DONALD ANDREWS,
DAVID APPEL, OLGA ARANIVA,
ANTONIO ARCINAS, ROBERT
ARRINGTON, EWY AXELSSON, JOHN
BAHURA, GLORIA BAILEY, IRMA
BAKER-PARRA, BRUCE BARMAKIAN,
RODRICK BARNETT, KEVIN BATMAN,
LORI BATMAN, DAVID BEAUBIEN,
MARILYN BEAUBIEN, AMANDA
BENNETT, GEORGE BENNETT,
ANNETTE BERRY, ROBERT BERRY,
ALVIN BLAKE, TAWANA BLAKE,
CAROLE BOOTH, JOHN BOOTH,
ARACELI BOWMAN, BILLY BOWMAN,
PATRICK PAYGAR BOYD, BARRY
BOZARTH, ARNOLD BRIGMAN,
DEBORAH BRIGMAN, VALERY
BUBELA, BONNIE BUCKLEY, TOBY
BUTTERWORTH, NELIDA CAMPOS,
JERRY CANADAY, MARIAN CANADY
MEIXNER, GEORGE CASTRO, FRANCIS
CELO, CARLOS CERVANTES, ROSE
CHANG, JOHN CHARLSON,
KATHERINE CHARLSON, DANIEL
CHAVEZ, JOSEPH CHAVOEN, JOSEPH
CINA, GRANT CLARK, SONIA CLARK,
HUGH COLLINS, SEAN COMBS,
ARTURO CONCHA, CHERIE COOK,
DENISE COOK, RANDALL COOK,
BENJAMIN CORONA, DIONICO
CORTEZ, BERTHA CREVOLIN, RONNIE
CREVOLIN, MATTHEW CROSBIE,
CARY CRUZ, ROSEMARY CRUZ,
HOUSTON CURTIS, ERIC CUTLER,
CHARLES DANIELS, CHRISTINA
DANIELS, RICARDO DAVALOS,
CURTIS DAVIDSON, TROY DAVIS,
SARGIS DAVODDANIEL, DON DECKER,
TAMMY DECKER, PAZ DIAZ, OLIC
DUNNING III, DAVID EBADAT,
HOTOSA EBRAHIMZADEH, KENNETH
EDGECOMBE, NICOLE EDGECOMBE,
MEHRDAD EMSHA, MARTIN
ESCOBEDO, YOLANDA ESCOBEDO,
ENRIQUETA ESPINOSA, FELIPA
ESPINOSA, FRANCISCO ESPINOSA,
JOSE ESPINOSA, DAVID ESTRADA, TY
ETTERLEIN, FATEMEH FADAKAR,
DAVID FAULHABER, MICHELLE
FAVAZZO, ROGER FENSTERMACHER,
LIZETTE MILAN-FIEDLER, FUMIKO
FISHER, RICHARD FOMIN, LOURDES
FONTZ, WAYNE FONTZ, ROGER
FOSDICK, SUSAN FRANCO, JAMES
FRASER, JO ELLEN FRASER, D’ANN
FRIEND, MATTHEW FRIEND, PHILLIP
GALERA, BENJAMIN GAMEZ,
JOSEFINA PEREZ GARCIA, ANTHONY
GOLDEN, JOSEPH GOMEZ, ANA
GONZALEZ, ESTER GONZALEZ,
OSCAR GONZALEZ, ROBERT GRAHAM,
RONNIE GREEN, SUSANNA GREEN,
GRETA GREGORIO, STEVEN
GUMIENNY, BRIAN GURNEE, AHMAD
HAKIMJAVADI, RICHARD HALE, JACK
HALLEY, TRACEY HAMPTON,
CHERISE HANSSON, STEVEN HARDIE,
CINDY HARRISON, JOAN HENDERSONBROWN,
LESLIE HENDRICKS, RUSSEL
HENDRICKS, CENOBIO HERNANDEZ,
LEONARD HERNANDEZ, MODJULITA
HERNANDEZ, ALFREDO HERRERA,
LORENA HERRERA, MARIO HERRERA,
BRETT HESKETT, RIZZA HESKETT,
RAYMOND HILL, ARMANDO
HINOJOSA, HEATH HODEL,
SALVADOR HUIZAR, PATRICK HUNT,
JOSEPH IGNACIO, REBECCA IGNACIO,
CYNTHIA IRELAND, CLARENCE
IRVING, EVELYN IRVING,
MUHAMMAD ISLAM, GLEN JACKSON,
HILLARY JACKSON, PAUL JACKSON,
JESSE JOHNSON, NICHOLAS JONES,
JEAN JOSEPH, MARIE JOSEPH, GUS
KATSIKIDES, CASEY KAUER,
JENNIFER KAUER, JOHN KEALY,
KEVIN KEEHL, CARLEEN KELLER,
DENNIS KEMP, GLORY KENNISON,
LANCE KENNISON, BARBARA
KIKUGAWA, CHRIS KIM, JAY KIM,
LYNN KIMBERLY, LOUIS KLEIN,
HARKRISHNAN KOCHAR, JASPAL
KOCHAR, BRENT KOMOUROUS, DEAN
KRAEMER, JOSHUA KREITZER,
KATHRYN T. KREITZER, PETE
KREUZER, MAZLINA LAI, STEPHANIE
LANDEN, JENNIFER LANGLO, ASHLEY
LARSEN, CHRISTIAN LARSEN, BRUCE
LAWSON, TRAVIS LEAGE, LISA
LEFEBVRE, RAYMOND LEFEBVRE,
JACK LEFLER, JOELLA LEFLER,
JACQUELYNN LEONARDO, CARMEN
LINARES, LUIS LINARES, ED LIZARDO,
LINDA LIZARDO, CHERYL LOCEY,
LAUREN LOCEY, DANILO LUQUIAS,
YOLINA LUQUIAS, JOHN MACIAS,
LOUIS MAGES, PATRICIA MAGES,
STEFAN MAHALEY, HEATHER
MAHONEY, DENISE MANRIQUEZ,
LAURIE MARINO, EDUARDO
MARQUEZ, ELNORA MARSHALL,
BRUNO MARTINEZ, FRANK
MARTINEZ, MELANDO MARTINEZ,
MIKE MARTINEZ, ELIZABETH MATSIK,
CALVIN MATTHEWS, ELIZABETH
MCCULLOUGH, SEAN MCDONALD,
MARY MEDINA, DAVID MEDLIN,
BRUCE MILLIGAN, RENE MINNAAR,
RABIA MIR, MARIA MIRANDA, TOBY
MOORE, LEONIDES MORALES, ERICA
MORGERA, PETE MORGERA,
BASHEER MURAD, CAAMIE MURAD,
VALLIUR NADU, HIROSHI
NAKAYAMA, YOLANDA NATIVIDAD,
MARIA NAVARRO, OSCAR NAVARRO,
ALAN NESS, SANDRA NESS, DIANA
NEWSON, RALPH NEWSON, ANNA
NGUYEN, MICHELLE NUNIES, JOHN
OCAMPO, NOEL OLIVARES, ROMAN
OLIVOS, MELISSA OWEN, MICHAEL
OWEN, JOHN OXIDINE, JUAN
PADILLA, MECIA PADILLA, JOSE
PANTOJA, MARIA PANTOJA, ALAN
PARSONS, CINDY PATELSKI, KAZIMIR
PATELSKI, MARIA PELCASTRE,
MARIO A. PERALTA, RICARDO PEREZ,
JAMES PETERSON, VIRGINIA
PETERSON, JOHN PHILLINGANE,
CAROL POWERS, DOUGLAS POWERS,
ANNA MARIA PREZIO, REBECCA
QUICK, STEVEN QUICK, WILLIAM
RABELLO, NOOROLLAH RAHDAR,
ELISEO RAMOS, ISRAEL RAPURI,
DINYAH REIN, NORMAN JAY REST,
EDITHA RESTAURO, DONALD REY,
NANCY RILEY, BARBARA ROBINSON,
STEPHEN ROBINSON, ARTHUR
RODRIGUEZ, JOSE LUIS RODRIGUEZ,
MARCIANO RODRIGUEZ, ETHAN ROSS,
VIRGINIA ROTRAMEL, FLORENCE
SABAGQUIT, JESSE SABAGQUIT,
GUILLERMO SANCHEZ, DERRICK
SANDERS, CARL SANKO, JOSEPH
SANTOS, SIMON SARKISIAN, DAN
SCHWARTZ, BRANNON SCIANNA,
MARCIA SCIANNA, DEBBIE
SCIORTINO, JOHN SCIORTINO,
COURTNEY SCOTT, CRANFORD
SCOTT, SHEILA SCOTT, BRIAN
SEXSON, PETER SHELDON, SCOTT
SHUBB, PAUL SIBORO, JULIET SICSIC,
BAYAANI SIMPLICIANO, BALDEV
SINGH, BALJIT SINGH, JOANNA
SINGH, ALICE SMITH, CHARLEY
SMITH, MARK SMITH, NIDA SMITH,
WILLIE SMITH, MILTON SMITH II,
JOANNE SNYDER-DAVIDSON, DIEP
SOMMERS, RICHARD SORENSEN,
HEMALATHA SOURI-PARSONS,
ROBBIN STITES, ALINA STROUP,
GEORGE STROUP, SUZANNE SUGGS,
SHYAM SUNDER, SALLY SYMONS,
GILDA TAHMURESZADEH,
ASHMELLEY THERVIL, KEVIN
THOMPSON, BOB TIDD, BETTY
TIMBERS, SONIKA TINKER-REIN,
ANDREY TODOROV, ADNAN TORIAK,
ALMA TOWNSEND, GREG TOWNSEND,
MARY JANE TUMA, TIMOTHY TUMA,
TONY TURTURICI, CINDY VICKERY,
WILLIAM VICKERY, ELIAS VIEYRA,
ENRIQUE VILLANUEVA, REBECCA
VILLANUEVA, NADIA VILLARREAL,
CHRISTOPHER VILLARUZ, LINDA H.
VO, PATRICK VUONG, LAURA
WALDHEIM, MICHAEL WALDHEIM,
JILL WALKER, KEVIN WALKER, ZANE
WALKER, GURMEET WARAICH,
HARJINDER WARAICH, MELISSA
WARNER, STEPHEN WAYNE, WALTER
WEISS, EDNA WENNING, JAMIE
WETZEL, JIM WETZEL, TODD
WIDENER, VERONICA WIDENER,
MELISSA WIDLUND, TIMOTHY
WIDLUND, CRAIG WILLIAMS, ANN
WILSON, RICHARD WILSON, EDWIN
ALDANA, AUDRENE ANN
ALENCASTRE-ROBERTS, LEPHAS
BAILEY, GURDAYAL BATNA,
KAMLESH BATNA, DARLENE BEEKS,
JAMES BEEKS, ANDRES BENAVIDEZ,
EDWARD BOSTOCK, SUZAN BRITTAN –
BERGMAN, CARLA CALER, NORMAN
CALER, STEVEN CAMPANELLI, JOSE
CAMPOS, MARIA ANTONIA CANALES,
GERARD CANNELLA, MELANIE
CANNELLA, LARRY CAPOTS, ANDRES
CARDENAS – BENAVIDEZ, BRIAN
CARLSON, JON CARLSON, KIMBERLY
CARLSON, LUCY CARLSON, DAWN
CARMICHAEL, KIRK CARMICHAEL,
JACQUELINE CARROLL, JOSEPHINA
CASELLON, SHAWN CASSIDY,
ANTONIO CHAVEZ, JOSE CHAVEZ,
MARY CLOWNEY, WILLIAM
CLOWNEY, HUGH COLLINS, BRENDA
COPPER, DEAN COPPER, MARIA CRUZ,
CHRISTINE DAO, AVELINA DIZON,
HONORIO DIZON, SANDRA DUARTE,
JOSE DUARTE LEMUS, ANA DUENAS,
STEVEN EHLERS, MICHELLE
FAVAZZO, WILFREDO FELICIANO,
SALLY FIGUEIREDO, FELICIA FLORES,
CARLOS FLORES-CARRILLO, DIANE
FORSMAN, CORRINE FRAYSINETTE,
ANTONIO FUENTES, MARIA ELENA
FUENTES, VICKI FURR, WAYNE FURR,
OSCAR GARCIA, ROBERT GREGG,
MAGDALENA GUIZAR, DARLENE N.
HOLLOWAY, RALPH HOLLOWAY,
HARLEY HUNTER, JEAN HUNTER,
GERDA HYPPOLITE, JOSEPH IGNACIO,
REBECCA IGNACIO, ROGER JAMES,
ARMANDO JIMENEZ, JAVIER JIMENEZ,
SANDY JIMENEZ, DIANE KEPLEY,
RICHARD KEPLEY, GLADYS KRANTZ,
RICHARD KRANTZ, DEBORAH LAMB,
MANUEL LANDAVAZO, SHERRIE
LANDOVASO, THEIN LAM LE, KEN
LEON, CONSUELO LOMBERA,
HILARIO LUCERO, ADELFO MACASA,
LEONARDA MACASA, JANET
MARSHALL, JULIO MARTINS,
ROBERTO MEDINA, BRUCE MILLIGAN,
BAHMAN MIRSHAFIEE, FARAHNAZ
MIRSHAFIEE, KIMBERLY MITCHELL,
WILLIAM MITCHELL, MARIA MOULES,
JOSE NARIO, STEVEN NEWTON,
KAREN NIERHAKE, CINDY OCHOA,
DEANA OSEGUERA, JOSE OSEGUERA,
MANUEL CASTRO PALMA, ROMINA
PAREDES, KEN PARKER, DON PEDEN,
SOCORRO PEREDA, IRVING PHAN,
LUZ RAMIREZ, SEYED RAZAVI,
GERALD ROBERTS, LISA RODRIGUEZ,
JOSEPH R. RODRIGUEZ JR., OFELIA
ROMERO, JOE SALAZAR, REGINALD
SANTIAGO, MICHAEL SANTOS,
YVONNE SANTOS, GEORGE SEELEY,
TERRY SHAFFER, CHERYL SHAW,
CHRISTINE SHIPMAN, JAMES
SHIPMAN, ANABEL SILVA, MARTIN
SILVA, MIKE SMITH, JONNY MARIE
TORRES, JORGE TORRES, CHARLOTTE
O. TUCKER, WILLIAM TUCKER,
THEREISI VILLARUZE, HUY VO,
DAVID WALLACE, VICTORIA
WALLACE, KLAUDIA WILCZKOWIAK,
JAMES WRAY, LEROY ANDERSON,
ALEXANDER ARRORACI, RENEE
BAYLIS, DENNIS BULMER, RICHARD
CARROLL, DORIS COBURN, GEORGE
COBURN, KC CRANDALL, KEITH
DENSON, SALLY FIGUEIREDO,
CHERYL FORD, EDGART GONZALEZ,
STEVE KONG, JEFF LAVENDER, MARA
LAVENDER, ROBERT LEWIN, JAMES
LOCKER, AVELINO MARTINEZ, AIDA
MEZA, JOSE MEZA, VIRGEN
MONDRAGON, WILLIAM OAKS,
DOMINADOR RAMOS, PETRONILLA
RAMOS, ESME ROSS, ROBERT ROSS,
CHRISTINE SHIPMAN, JAMES
SHIPMAN, CHARLES TAM, RUBY TAM,
RAYMOND TRAN, ROBERTO VARGAS,
RUTH VARGAS, RONALD WILLIAMS
Plaintiffs

-against-

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., BANK OF
AMERICA CORPORATION,
COUNTRYWIDE FINANCIAL
CORPORATION, dba BAC HOME
LOANS SERVICING,
COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.,
JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., in its
own capacity and as an acquirer of certain
assets and liabilities of Washington
Mutual Bank; CHASE HOME FINANCE,
LLC, WELLS FARGO & COMPANY,
WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., WACHOVIA
BANK, CITIGROUP, INC., CITIBANK,
N.A., U.S. BANCORP, U.S. BANK, N.A.,
U.S. BANK TRUST COMPANY,
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, U.S. BANK
TRUST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, ALLY
BANK, N.A., in its own capacity and as an
acquirer of certain assets and liabilities OF
GMAC, GENERAL MOTORS
ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION,
ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B., HSBC
HOLDINGS, INC., AURORA BANK, F.S.B.,
OCWEN FINANCIAL CORPORATION,
DEUTSCHE BANK AG, DEUTSCHE
BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY,
EMC CORPORATION, EMC MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, PNC BANK, N.A., ING
GROUP, MERSCORP, INC., MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC., COUNTRYWIDE ALTERNATIVE
ASSET MANAGEMENT,
COUNTRYWIDE ALTERNATIVE
INVESTMENTS, COUNTRYWIDE
CAPITAL I, COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL
II, COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL III,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL IV,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL V,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL VI,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL VII,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL VIII,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL IX,
COUNTRYWIDE CAPITAL MARKETS
ASIA (HK) LIMITED, COUNTRYWIDE
CAPITAL MARKETS, COUNTRYWIDE
COMMERCIAL JPI LLC,
COUNTRYWIDE COMMERCIAL
MORTGAGE CAPITAL,
COUNTRYWIDE COMMERCIAL
REAL ESTATE FINANCE,
COUNTRYWIDE HILLCREST I,
COUNTRYWIDE INTERNATIONAL
GP HOLDINGS, COUNTRYWIDE
MANAGEMENT CORPORATION,
COUNTRYWIDE MORTGAGE
VENTURES, LLC, COUNTRYWIDE
INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY
HOLDINGS LIMITED,
COUNTRYWIDE WAREHOUSE
LENDING, CWABS II, INC., CWALT,
INC., CYRUS ACCESS, LTD.,
DIVERSIFIED ALPHA FUND
(MASTER), LTD., HALCYON ACCESS,
LTD., INDOPARK HOLDINGS, LTD.,
INVESTMENTS 2234 PHILIPPINES
FUND I (SPV-AMC), INC., ML
BANDERIA CAYMAN BRL INC.,
ML WHITBY LUXEMBOURG S.A.R.L.,
ZEUS RECOVERY FUND, S.A., J.P.
MORGAN MANSART INVESTMENTS,
SAPOTORO COOPERATIEF U.A., ONE
EQUITY PARTNERS II, L.P., ONE
EQUITY PARTNERS III, L.P., ONE
EQUITY PARTNERS IV, L.P., ONE
EQUITY PARTNERS LLC, BEAR
STEARNS INTERNATIONAL FUNDING I
S.A R.L., J.P. MORGAN DUBLIN
FINANCIAL HOLDINGS LIMITED,
J.P.MORGAN FINANCE JAPAN YK, J.P.
MORGAN SERVICES INDIA PRIVATE
LIMITED, HENRY BATH BV, GAVEA
INVESTIMENTOS LTDA., J. P. MORGAN
RESEARCH TOTAL RETURN MASTER
FUND LTD, JPMORGAN DISTRESSED
DEBT MASTER FUND LTD. , JPMORGAN
GREATER CHINA PROPERTY FUND
CAYMAN SLP LP, JPMORGAN ASSET
MANAGEMENT HOLDINGS
(LUXEMBOURG) S.A R.L., JPMORGAN
ASSET MANAGEMENT LUXEMBOURG
S.A., J.P. MORGAN CHASE CUSTODY
SERVICES, INC., ATACAMA
MULTIMERCADO – FUNDO DE
INVESTIMENTO, J.P. MORGAN S.A.
DISTRIBUIDORA DE TITULOS E
VALORES MOBILIARIOS, J.P. MORGAN
BANK LUXEMBOURG S.A., BANCO J.P.
MORGAN S.A., INSTITUCION DE BANCA
MULTIPLE, J.P. MORGAN GRUPO
FINANCIERO, J.P. MORGAN
INTERNATIONAL HOLDINGS LIMITED,
JPMORGAN CHASE BANK (CHINA)
COMPANY LIMITED CHINA, JPMORGAN
PCA HOLDINGS (MAURITIUS) I
LIMITED, DANUBE HOLDINGS I C.V.,
DANUBE HOLDINGS III C.V.,
EUROPEAN CREDIT FUND SICAV II,
EVERGREEN ECM HOLDINGS B.V.,
GOLDEN FUNDING COMPANY, ISLAND
FINANCE HOLDING COMPANY, LLC,
JORDAN INVESTMENTS LP UK,
NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS FII
SINGAPORE PRIVATE LIMITED,
NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS FVCI
SINGAPORE PRIVATE LIMITED,
NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS
SINGAPORE PRIVATE LIMITED,
NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS VI, LP,
NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS VI-A,
LP, NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS VII,
LP, NORWEST VENTURE PARTNERS
VII-A FII MAURITIUS, NORWEST
VENTURE PARTNERS VII-A FVCI
MAURITIUS, NORWEST VENTURE
PARTNERS VII-A MAURITIUS,
OVERLAND RELATIVE VALUE FUND
LTD., OVERLAND RELATIVE VALUE
MASTER FUND LP, PARTNERSHIP
INVESTMENTS S.A.R.L., CITIBANK
(CHINA) CO., LTD., CITIBANK DEL
PERU S.A., CITIBANK MAGHREB,
BANCO CITIBANK DE GUATEMALA,
S.A., BANCO CITIBANK S.A., CHELSEA
PARTICIPACOES SOCIETARIAS E
INVESTIMENTOS LTDA., CITIBANK –
DISTRIBUIDORA DE TITULOS E
VALORES MOBILIARIOS S.A.,
CITIFINANCIAL PROMOTORA DE
NEGOCIOS & COBRANCA LTDA.,
CITIBANK CORRETORA DE SEGUROS
LTDA., BANCO CITICARD S.A., BANK
HANDLOWY W WARSZAWIE S.A., CITI
OVERSEAS INVESTMENTS BAHAMAS
INC., CITIBANK CARTOES
PARTICIPACOES LTDA., CITIGROUP
GLOBAL MARKETS, CORPORATION &
CO. BESCHRANKT HAFTENDE KG,
CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS
DEUTSCHLAND AG, CITIBANK
MEDIADOR, OPERADOR DE BANCA –
SEGUROS VINCULADO, SOCIEDAD
ANONIMA, CITIBANK HOLDINGS
IRELAND LIMITED, CITICORP CAPITAL
PHILIPPINES, INC., CITICORP FINANCE
(INDIA) LIMITED, CITIGROUP ASIA
PACIFIC HOLDING CORPORATION,
CITIGROUP HOLDING (SINGAPORE)
PRIVATE LIMITED, CITIBANK (HONG
KONG) LIMITED, CITIBANK BERHAD,
CITIBANK MALAYSIA (L) LIMITED,
CITIGROUP NETHERLANDS HOLDINGS
B.V., LATIN AMERICAN INVESTMENT
BANK BAHAMAS LIMITED, ZAO
CITIBANK, CITIGROUP GLOBAL
MARKETS LUXEMBOURG, CITIGROUP
GLOBAL MARKETS, HOLDINGS
LIMITED, CITIGROUP GLOBAL
MARKETS, HOLDINGS PTE. LTD.,
CITIGROUP GLOBAL MARKETS,
SINGAPORE PTE. LTD., CITIGROUP
GLOBAL MARKETS INDIA PRIVATE
LIMITED, CITIGROUP GLOBAL
MARKETS COMMERCIAL CORP., COHM
OVERSEAS MEXICO HOLDING, S. DE
R.L. DE C.V., ELAVON DO BRASIL
SOLUCOES DE PAGAMENTO S.A.,
ELAVON EUROPEAN HOLDINGS B.V.,
ELAVON EUROPEAN HOLDINGS C.V.,
ELAVON FINANCIAL SERVICES
LIMITED, USB NETHERLANDS B.V., USB
REALTY CORP., USB TRADE SERVICES
LIMITED, ELAVON MERCHANT
SERVICES MEXICO, S. DE R.L. DE C.V.,
ELAVON MEXICO HOLDING COMPANY,
S.A. DE C.V., ELAVON OPERATIONS
COMPANY, S. DE R.I. DE C.V., ELAVON
PUERTO RICO, INC., ELAVON SERVICES
COMPANY, S. DE R.I. DE C.V., GMAC
HOLDINGS GMBH, GMAC GERMANY
GMBH & CO. KG, GMAC BANK GMBH,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-10CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-12CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-13CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-14T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-15,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-16CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-17CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-18CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-20T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-22CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-24CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-25CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-26T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-27CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-7T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-8CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-9T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-J7,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-J8,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004-J9,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-10CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-11CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-13CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-14,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-16,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-17,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-18CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-19CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-20CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-21CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-22T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-23CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-24,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-25T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-26CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-27,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-28CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-29CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-30CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-31,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-32T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-33CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-34CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-35CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-36,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-37T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-38,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-4,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-40CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-41,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-42CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-43,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-44,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-45,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-46CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-47CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-48T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-49CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-50CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-51,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-53T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-54CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-55CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-56,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-57CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-58,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-59,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-60T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-61,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-62,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-63,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-64CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-65CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-6CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-70CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-71,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-74T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-75CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-75CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-76,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-77T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-79CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-7CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-80CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-81,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-82,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-83CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-84,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-85CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-86CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-9CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-AR1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-IM1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J10,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J11,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J11,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J4,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J6,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2005-J7,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-0C5,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-11CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-12CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-13T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-14CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-15CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-16CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-17T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-18CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-19CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-20CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-21CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-21CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-21CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-23CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-23CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-24CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-25CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-25CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-26CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-26CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-27CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-28CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-29T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-2CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-30T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-31CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-31CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-32CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-33CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-34,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-35CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-36T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-37R,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-39CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-40T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-41CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-42,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-43CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-45T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-46,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-4CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-5T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-6CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-7CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-8T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-9T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY10,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY11,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY12,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY3,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J3,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J4,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J5,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J6,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J7,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-J8,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA10,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA11,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA12,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA14,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA16,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA17,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA18,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA19,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA21,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA22,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA3,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA6,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA7,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA8,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OA9,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC10,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC11,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC3,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC4,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC6,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC7,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC8,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC9,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-10CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-11T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-12T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-13,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-14T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-15CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-16CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-17CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-18CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-19,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-1T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-20,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-21CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-22,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-23CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-23CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-24,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-25,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-2CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-3T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-4CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-5CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-6,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-7T2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-8CB,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-9T1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-AL1,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-HY2,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-HY3,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-HY4,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-
HY5R, ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2007-HY6, ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2007-HY7C, ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST 2007-HY8C, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-HY9, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-HY9, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-J1, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-J2, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA10, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA11, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA2, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA3, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA4, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA6, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA7, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA8, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OA9, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OH1, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OH2, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-OH3, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST MORT PASS THROUGH
CERT SERIES 2003-4, ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST RESECURITIZATION 2005-
12R, ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
RESECURITIZATION 2006-22R,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
RESECURITIZATION 2007-26R,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
RESECURITIZATION 2008-1R,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
RESECURITIZATION 2008-2R,
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2003-1, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2003-3,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2003-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2005-12, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-1,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2006-2, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-3, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-4,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2006-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-6, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-7,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2006-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-9, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-1,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2007-2, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-10, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-11, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-12, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-4, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-6, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-7, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-9, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-1, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-10, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-11, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-2, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-3, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-4, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-6, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-7, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-9, BANC OF
AMERICA MORT SEC INC
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2003 11,
BANC OF AMERICA MORT SEC INC
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004 2,
CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2001-23, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2001-23, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2002-HYB1, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-10, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-11, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-12, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-13, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-14, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-16, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-18, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-19, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-20, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-21, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-22, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-23, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-24, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-5, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-5, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-6, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-7, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-8, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-9, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-HYB7, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-HYB8, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-HYB9, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-11, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-12, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-13, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-14, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-15, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-16, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-17, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-18, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-19, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-20, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-21, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-22, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-23, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-24, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-25, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-27, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-28, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-29, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-30, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-31, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-6, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-9, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-HYB1, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-HYB10, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-HYB2, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-HYB3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-HYB4, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-HYB5, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-HYB6, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-HYB7, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-HYB8, CHL MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH TRUST 2005-J2, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-J3, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-J4, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-1, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-10, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-11, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-12, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-13, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-14, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-15, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-16, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-17, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-18, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-19, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-20, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-21, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-6, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-8, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-9, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-HYB1, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-HYB2, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-HYB3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-HYB4, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-HYB5, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-J1, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-J2, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-J3, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2006-J4, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2006-OA5, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-1, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-10, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-11, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-12, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-13, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-14, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-15, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-16, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-17, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-18, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-19, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-2, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-20, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-21, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-4, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-5, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-6, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-7, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-8, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-HY6, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-HY7, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-HYB1, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-HYB2, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-J1, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-J2, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2007-J3, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2007-J3, CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2008-1, CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
RESECURITIZATION 2008-2R, CWMBS
CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2004-HYB5, CWMBS CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-J7, CWMBS CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-J8, CWMBS CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2004-J9, CWMBS INC – CHL MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2004-25,
CWMBS INC – CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2004-29, CWMBS INC –
CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2005-2, CWMBS INC – CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-4, CWMBS INC – CHL MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2005-5, CWMBS
INC CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2002-21, CWMBS INC CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2003 4, CWMBS INC CHL MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2003-26,
CWMBS INC CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2003-3, CWMBS INC
CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2003-42, CWMBS INC CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2003-48, CWMBS INC CHL MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH TRUST 2004-J3,
CWMBS, INC. – CHL MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
TRUST 2005-1, CWMBS, INC. –
CHL MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
TRUST 2005-7, CWMBS, INC., CHL
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH TRUST
2005-26, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2003-3,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2003-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-1, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-2,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2006-3, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-4, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-5,
BANC OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE
LOAN TRUST 2006-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-9, BANC OF AMERICA
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-10, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-11, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-12, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-4, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-6, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-7, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-9, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-1, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-10, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-11, BANC
OF AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-2, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-3, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-4, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-5, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-6, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-7, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-8, BANC OF
AMERICA ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-9, BANC OF
AMERICA MORT SEC INC
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2003 11,
BANC OF AMERICA MORT SEC INC
ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2004 2,
BANC OF AMERICA MORT SEC INC
ALTERNATIVER LOAN TRUST 2003-10,
BANC OF AMERICA MORTGAGE
SECURITIES INC, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-3,
ASSET-BACKED CERTS., SERIES 2004-3,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2004-4, ASSET-BACKED CERTS.,
SERIES 2004-4, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-5,
ASSET-BACKED CERTS., SERIES 2004-5,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2004-6, ASSET-BACKED CERTS.,
SERIES 2004-6, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-1,
ASSET-BACKED CERTS., SERIES 2005-1,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-2 ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-2, LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
3 ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2005-3, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-WL1
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2005-WL1, LONG BEACH MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-WL2 ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-WL3,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-1, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-10,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-11, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-2, LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
3, LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-4, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-5, LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
6, LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-7, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-8, LONG
BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
9, LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-A, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WL1,
LONG BEACH MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-WL2, LONG BEACH
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WL3,
LONG BEACH SECURITIES CORP,
WAMU ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES,
WAMU SERIES 2007-HE1, WAMU
ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, WAMU
SERIES 2007-HE2, WAMU ASSETBACKED
CERTIFICATES, WAMU SERIES
2007-HE3, WAMU ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, WAMU SERIES 2007-
HE4, WAMU MOR PASS THRU CERT SER
2001-AR1, WAMU MORTAGE PASS
THRU CERT SER 2003-S8, WAMU
MORTAGE PASS THRU CERT SERIES
2003-AR3, WAMU MORTGAGE PASS
THR CERTS SER 2003-AR12, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CER SER
2003-AR8, WAMU MORTGAGE PASS
THROUGH CERT 2002-AR10, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERT SER
2002-AR19, WAMU MORTGAGE PASS
THROUGH CERT SER 2003-S1, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERT
SERIES 2001-5, WAMU MORTGAGE
PASS THROUGH CERT SERIES 2001-S8,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES 2002-S1, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES 2002-S7, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2001-AR2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2001-AR3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2001-AR4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2001-S11, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002 AR12,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002 AR14,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR11,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR13,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR15,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR16,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR17,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-AR3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-S2, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-S3, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-S4, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-S6, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-S6, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003 S3, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003 S4, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-AR1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-AR4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-AR5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-AR6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-S2, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTS
SER 2003-AR10, WAMU MORTGAGE
PASS THROUGH CERTS SER 2003-S10,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTS SER 2003-S11, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTS
SER 2003-S9, WAMU MORTGAGE PASS
THROUGH CERTS SERIES 2003-S5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTS SERIES 2004-S1, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS THRU CERTIFICATE
SERIES 2001-AR6, WAMU MORTGAGE
PASS THRU CERTIFICATES SERIES
2002-MS8, WAMU MORTGAGE PASS
THRU CERTIFICATES SERIES 2002-MS9,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS THRU CERTS
SERIES 2002-ARS, WAMU MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATE SERIES
2002-AR4, WAMU MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES SER 2003-S12,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2001-S10, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-S7, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004 AR-3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-AR1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-AR2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-AR4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-AR6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-CB1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-RS2, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-S2, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR10,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR11,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR13,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR14,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR7,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR8,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-AR9,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-S3, WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR10,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR12,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR13,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR14,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR15,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR16,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR17,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR18,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR19,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR7,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR8,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR8,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-AR9,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR10,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR11,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR12,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR13,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR14,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR15,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR16,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR17,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR18,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR19,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR7,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR8,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR9,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HY7,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA1,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA2,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA3,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA4,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA5,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-OA6,
WAMU MORTGAGE PASS-THRU CERT
SERIES 2003-AR2, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PA TH CE SE 02 AR7, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PA TH CE SE 03 S6, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PA TH CE SE 2002 S5, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PA TH CE SE 2002-AR9, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PA TH CER SE 02 AR18, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PS TH CE SE 03 AR9, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MO
PS TH CE SE 03 S13, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU MOR
PAS TH CE SE 03 AR7, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC CORP WAMU
SERIES 2003-AR11, WASHINGTON
MUTUAL MORT SEC WAMU MOR PA TH
CE SE 2002 AR2, AMERIQUEST
MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R4,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R6,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R7,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R8,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R9,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC. ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-IA1,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC. ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R10,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC. ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R11,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-1,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-6,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-AR2,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-AR3,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R10,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R5,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R6,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R7,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R8,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R9,
AMERIQUEST MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST 2006-R1, ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-
R1, ARGENT SECURITIES INC, ARGENT
SECURITIES INC ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-
W7, ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-PW1,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-W10,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-W11,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-W9,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC. , ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-W1,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W2,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W3,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W4,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W5,
ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-W2,
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-W7, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-R2, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-W1, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-R2, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-R12,
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-R5, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-R4,
CARRINGTON HOME EQUITY LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-NC4 ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE1,
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WFHE1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC. ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-
WF1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC. ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-
WF2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-
WMC1, GE-WMC ASSET-BACKED PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-
2, HOMESTAR MORTGAGE
ACCEPTANCE CORP ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2004-4, MORTGAGE ASSET-BACKED
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2005-QS9, OPTEUM MORTGAGE
ACCEPTANCE CORP, OPTEUM
MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE CORP.
ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4, PARK
PLACE SECURITIES INC ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WCW1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., PARK
PLACE SECURITIES, INC. ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-MCW1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-MHQ1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WCH1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WCW2,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WHQ1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WHQ2,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-WWF1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WCW2,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WCW2,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WCW3,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WHQ1,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WHQ4,
PARK PLACE SECURITIES, INC., ASSET-
BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WLL1,
AMERICAN HOME MORT SECURITIES
HOME MORTGAGE INVEST TR 2004-1,
AMERICAN HOME MORT SECUTIES
HOME MORTGAGE INVEST TR 2004-1,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS
LLC, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2005-1, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2005-2, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2006-1, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2006-2, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2006-3, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2006-4, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2006-5, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2006-6, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-1, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2007-2, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-3, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE ASSETS TRUST
2007-4, AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
ASSETS TRUST 2007-5, AMERICAN
HOME MORTGAGE INVESTMENT CORP,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2004-2,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2004-3,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2004-4,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2005-1,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2005-2,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2005-3,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2005-4,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2006-1,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2006-2,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2006-3,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2007-1,
AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE
INVESTMENT TRUST 2007-2, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SEC INC REMIC CER
SERIES 2003-9, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SEC INC REMIC PASS THR CER SER
2003-3, CITICORP MORTGAGE SEC INC
REMIC PASS THR CERTS SERIES 2003 5,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SEC INC REMIC
PASS-THR CERT SER 2003-4, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES INC, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2006-1, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2006-2,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2006-3, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2006-4, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2006-5,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2006-6, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2006-7, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2007-1,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2007-2, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2007-3, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2007-4,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2007-5, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2007-6, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2007-7,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2007-8, CITICORP
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST,
SERIES 2007-9, CITICORP MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST, SERIES 2008-1,
CITICORP MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST, SERIES 2008-2, CITICORP
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE SECURITIES,
INC., CITICORP RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE TRUST SERIES 2006-1,
CITICORP RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
TRUST SERIES 2006-2, CITICORP
RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE TRUST
SERIES 2006-3, CITICORP RESIDENTIAL
MORTGAGE TRUST SERIES 2007-1,
CITICORP RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE
TRUST SERIES 2007-2, CITIGROUP
MORT LN TR ASST BACK PS THR
CERTS SER 2003-HE3, CITIGROUP MORT
LOAN TRUST INC ASSET BK PAS THR
CE SE 03 HE2, CITIGROUP MORT LOAN
TRUST INC MORT PAS THR CERT SE 03
1, CITIGROUP MORTGAG LOAN TRUST
SERIES 2003-UP3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-11,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-6, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-4, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AMC1, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-AR5, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR6, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR7,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-AR9, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-CB3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FX1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-HE1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-HE2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-HE3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-NC1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-NC2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WF1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-WF2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE1, ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WFHE1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-WFHE2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-WFHE4,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-10, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-6, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-8,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-AHL1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-AHL2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AHL3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-AMC1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-AMC2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AMC3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-AMC4, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-AR1, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR4,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-AR5, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-CB3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-OPX1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-WFHE1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2007-WFHE2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-WFHE3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2007-WFHE4, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST INC, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC
CARRINGTON MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2004-NC2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC C-BASS
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-CB7,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC SERIES 2004-HYB3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC SERIES
2004-NCM2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST INC SERIES 2004-OPT1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC SERIES 2004-UST1, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC SERIES
2004-UST1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST INC SERIES 2005-OPT1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC SERIES 2005-OPT2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC,
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC. 2005-4, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST INC. 2005-7, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC. ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WF1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC. ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WF2,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-NCM1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-2,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC. SERIES 2004 – HYB4, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., ASSETBACKED
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WMC1,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC., SERIES 2005-3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., SERIES
2005-5, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., SERIES 2005-8, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., SERIES
2005-9, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., SERIES 2005-HE3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC., SERIES 2005-HE4, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., SERIES
2006-AR2, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST INC., SERIES 2006-AR3,
CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
INC., SERIES 2007-AR7, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES 2003
UST-1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST SERIES 2004-CB3, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES 2004-
HYB1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST SERIES 2004-HYB2, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2004-
RES1, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-10, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2005-
CB4, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-CB8, C-BASS
MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED
CERTIFICATES, CITIGROUP
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2005-
OPT3, CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-OPT4, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A1, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A2, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A3, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A4, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A5, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A6, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2006-A7, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A1, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A2, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A3, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A4, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A5, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A6, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A7, CMALT
(CITIMORTGAGE ALTERNATIVE LOAN
TRUST), SERIES 2007-A8, STRUCTURED
ASSET MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II
INC, STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II INC., HOMEBANC
MORTGAGE TRUST 2004-2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2004-AR4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2004-AR6,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2004-AR7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2004-AR8,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR5,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR6,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-AR8,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-F1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-F2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2005-F3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR5,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR6,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2006-AR8,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR5,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR6,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST 2007-AR7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST SERIES 2004-
AR3, STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II TRUST SERIES 2005-
AR1, STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS TRUST 2003 AR3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS TRUST 2003-AR1, SG
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2005-
OPT1, SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES
TRUST 2006-FRE1, SG MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST 2006-FRE2, SG
MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2006-
OPT2, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR1, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR11, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR12, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR13, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR14, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR15, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR2, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR3, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR4, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR5, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR6, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR7, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2004-AR8, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-
AR9, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR1, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR10, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR11, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR12, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR13, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR14, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR15, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR16IP, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR17, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR18, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR19, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR2, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR21, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR23, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR25, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR27, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR29, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR3, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR31, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR33, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR35, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR4, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR5, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR6, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR7, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
AR8, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR9, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR11, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR12, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR13, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR14, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR15, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR19, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR2, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR21, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR23, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR25, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR27, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR27, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR29, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR3, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR31, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR33, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR35, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR37, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR39, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR4, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR41, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR5, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR6, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR7, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
AR8, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-AR9, INDYMAC
INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-
FLX1, INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2006-R1, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR1,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-AR11, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR13,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-AR15, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR17,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-AR19, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR21IP,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-AR5, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-AR7,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-AR9, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-FLX1,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-FLX2, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-FLX3,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-FLX4, INDYMAC INDX
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-FLX5,
INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-FLX6, GMAC MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2004-AR1, RESIDENTIAL ASSET
MORTGAGE PRODUCTS INC, GMACM
HOME EQUITY LOAN BACKED NOTES
SERIES 2002-HE4, GMACM HOME
EQUITY LOAN BACKED TERM NOTES
SER 2003-HE1, GMACM HOME EQUITY
LOAN BACKED TERM NOTES SERIES
2000-HE4, GMACM HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2003-HE2, GMACM HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-HE3,
GMACM HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2004-HE4, GMACM HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2004-HE5, GMACM HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2005-HE1,
GMACM HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2005-HE2, GMACM HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2005-HE3, GMACM HOME
EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-HE5,
GMACM HOME EQUITY LOAN-BACKED
NOTES SERIES 2001-HE1, GMACM
HOME EQUITY LOAN-BACKED TERM
NOTES SERIES 2001-HE2, GMACM
HOME EQUITY LOAN-BACKED TERM
NOTES SERIES 2001-HE3, GMACM
HOME LOAN BACKED TERM NOTES
SERIES 2000-CL1, GMACM HOME LOAN
BACKED TERM NOTES SERIES 2000-
HLTV2, GMACM HOME LOAN BACKED
TERM NOTES SERIES 2002-HLTV1,
GMACM HOME LOAN TRUST 2004-
HLTV1, GMACM HOME LOAN-BACKED
TERM NOTES SERIES 2001-CL1, GMACM
HOME LOAN-BACKED TERM NOTES
SERIES 2001-HLTV1, GMACM HOME
LOAN-BACKED TERM NOTES SERIES
2001-HLTV2, GMACM MORTGAGE
LOAN BACKED NOTES SERIES 2000-
HE3, GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2003-J7, GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2004-GH1, GMACM MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AA1, GMACM
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-AF1,
GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-AF2, GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-AR1, GMACM MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR2, GMACM
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-AR3,
GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2005-AR4, GMACM MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-AR5, GMACM MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST 2005-AR6, GMACM
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-J1,
GMACM MORTGAGE PASS THRU
CERTS SERIES 2003-J8, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERIFICATES, SERIES 2004-J5, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-J5, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-AR2,
GMACM MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-J2, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-J3, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-J4, GMACM
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-J6, RAAC
SERIES 2004-SP1 TRUST, RAAC SERIES
2004-SP2, RAAC SERIES 2004-SP3, RAAC
SERIES 2005-SP1 TRUST, RAAC SERIES
2005-SP3 TRUST, RAAC SERIES 2007 SP2
TRUST, RAAC SERIES 2007-SP1 TRUST,
RAAC SERIES 2007-SP3 TRUST, RAAC
SERIES 2007-SP3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2004-R12 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-RS1
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-RS1 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2004-RS10 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2004-RS11 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2004-RS2 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-
RS4 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-RS5
TRUS, RAMP SERIES 2004-RS6 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2004-RS7 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2004-RS8 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2004-RS9 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-
RZ2 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-RZ3
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-RZ3 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2004-RZ4 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2004-SL2 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2004-SL3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2004-SL4
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005 SL2 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-EFC1 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-EFC2, RAMP SERIES 2005-
EFC3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-EFC4
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-EFC5 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-EFC6 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-RS2 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2005-RS3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-
RS3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RS4
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RS5 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-RS6 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-RS7 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2005-RS8 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-
RS9 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RZ1
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RZ2 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-RZ3 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-RZ4 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2005-SL1 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-SP2
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2006-RS2 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2006-RS2 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2006-SP1 TRUST, RESIDENTIAL
ASSET BACKED PASS THR CERTS SER
2003-RS4, RESIDENTIAL ASSET GMACM
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-JR1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MOR PRO INC
GMACM MO PASS TH CE SE 2006 J6,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRO INC
GMACM MO PA TH CE SE 03 AR2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD
GMACM PS THR CERTS SER 2003-J4,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACH HM EQ LN TR 2002-HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ L N TR 04 HE2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2000 HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2000 HE2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2001 HE4,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2004 HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM MORT LN TR 03-J2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
RAMP SERIES 2004 RZ1 TRUST,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
RAMP SERIES 2004 SL1 TRUST,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODS INC
GMACM MORT LN TR 03 GH2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODS INC
GMACM MORT LOAN TR 03 J10,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCT
GMACM LOAN SER 2003-AR1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCTS
INC GMACM MORT LN TR 03 J3,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCTS
INC GMACM MORT LN TR 03-J1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE PROD
INC GMACM MOR LN TR 2003-GH1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE
PRODUCTS GMACM TRUST 2004-J1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE
PRODUCTS INC, RAMP SERIES 2005-RS3
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RS4 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-RS5 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-RS6 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2005-RS7 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-
RS8 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RS9
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-RZ1 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2005-RZ2 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2005-RZ3 TRUST, RAMP SERIES
2005-RZ4 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-
SL1 TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2005-SP2
TRUST, RAMP SERIES 2006-RS2 TRUST,
RAMP SERIES 2006-RS2 TRUST, RAMP
SERIES 2006-SP1 TRUST, RESIDENTIAL
ASSET BACKED PASS THR CERTS SER
2003-RS4, RESIDENTIAL ASSET GMACM
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-JR1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MOR PRO INC
GMACM MO PASS TH CE SE 2006 J6,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRO INC
GMACM MO PA TH CE SE 03 AR2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD
GMACM PS THR CERTS SER 2003-J4,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACH HM EQ LN TR 2002-HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ L N TR 04 HE2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2000 HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2000 HE2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2001 HE4,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM HOME EQ LN TR 2004 HE1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
GMACM MORT LN TR 03-J2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
RAMP SERIES 2004 RZ1 TRUST,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PROD INC
RAMP SERIES 2004 SL1 TRUST,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODS INC
GMACM MORT LN TR 03 GH2,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODS INC
GMACM MORT LOAN TR 03 J10,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCT
GMACM LOAN SER 2003-AR1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCTS
INC GMACM MORT LN TR 03 J3,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORT PRODUCTS
INC GMACM MORT LN TR 03-J1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE PROD
INC GMACM MOR LN TR 2003-GH1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE
PRODUCTS GMACM TRUST 2004-J1,
RESIDENTIAL ASSET MORTGAGE
PRODUCTS INC, RESIDENTIAL ASSET
MORTGAGE PRODUCTS INC TRUST
2000-HLTV1, RESIDENTIAL ASSET
MORTGAGE PRODUCTS RAMP TRUST
2004-RS3, RESIDENTIAL ASST MORT
PROD GMACM MT PS THR CERTS SER
2003-J9, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES 2007-
2, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES 2007-
OA5 /DE, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AF1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AR2, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AR3, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AR4, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AR5, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-AR6, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2006-OA1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-3, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-AR1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-AR2, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-AR3, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-OA1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-OA2, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST,
SERIES 2007-OA3 /DE, DEUTSCHE ALTA
SECURITIES MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2007-OA4 /DE,
DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-
RAMP1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-2, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-3, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-4, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-5, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-6, DEUTSCHE ALT-A SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2005-AR1, DEUTSCHE ALT-A
SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-AR2, DEUTSCHE
ALT-A SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-AR1,
DEUTSCHE ALT-B SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-
AB1, DEUTSCHE ALT-B SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-
AB3, DEUTSCHE ALT-B SECURITIES
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-
AB1, DEUTSCHE ALT-B SECURITIES,
INC. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES
2006-AB2, DEUTSHE ALT-A
SECURITIES, INC. MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST, SERIES 2005-AR1, MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST SERIES 2003-2XS, SASCO
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-GEL3,
SASCO MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
WF3, SASCO MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
SERIES 2003-GEL1, SASCO MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST SERIES 2004-GEL2, SASCO
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES 2005-
GEL1, SASCO MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
SERIES 2005-GEL2, SASCO MORTGAGE
LOAN TRUST SERIES 2005-GEL3, SASCO
MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-NC1,
SASCO MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-NC2,
SASCO MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-S4, SASCO
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFIDATES, SERIES 2005-WMC1,
STRUCT ASS MORT INV INC BS ALTA
MORT PAS THR CER SER 2003 1,
STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE RATE
MORTGAGE, STRUCTURED
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2004-5, STRUCTURED
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-3XS, STRUCTURED
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-6XS, STRUCTURED
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2005-8XS, STRUCTURED
ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-14,
STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE RATE
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2004-15, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-16,
STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE RATE
MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES
2004-17, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-12, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-15, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-16XS, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-17, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-18, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-2, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-20, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-20, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-21, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-22, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-23, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-4, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-7, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2005-7N, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-1, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-10, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-11, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-12, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-2, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-3, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-4, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-5, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-6, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-7, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-8, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2006-9, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-1, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-10, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-11, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-2, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-3, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-4, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-5, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-6, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-7, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-8, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2007-9, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2008-1, STRUCTURED ADJUSTABLE
RATE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST SERIES
2008-2, STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV
II INC BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 10,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 11,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 5,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 6,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 8,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 04 9,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 05 2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 05 3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ARM TR 2004 1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ARM TR 2004 2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
BEAR STEARNS ARM TRUST 03-7,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
MORT PAS THR CERT SE 04 CL1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
PRIME MORTGAGE TRUST 2003 2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV II INC
THORNBURG MORT SEC TR 03 5,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT A TR 03 4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
BEAR STEARNS ARM TRUST 2003 3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
MORT BACK NTS SER 2003-1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
MORT PAS THR CERTS SER 2003-3,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
MORT PASS THR CERTS SER 2003-1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INV INC
THORNBURG MORT SEC TR 2003-2,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INVEST
INC MORT PAS THR CERT SE 03 CL1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT INVEST
INC MORT PAS THR CERTS SER 03 1,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT
INVESTMENT THORNBURG SEC TRUST
2004-1, STRUCTURED ASSET MORT
PASS THRU CERTS SERIES 2003 AR4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORT PASS THRU
CERTS SERIES 2004 AR3, STRUCTURED
ASSET MORTGAGE INVEST TRUST
2003-AR2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II 2005-AR4,
STRUCTURED ASSET MORTGAGE
INVESTMENTS II INC, STRUCTURED
ASSET MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II
INC., HOMEBANC MORTGAGE TRUST
2004-2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II SERIES
2004-AR5, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2004-AR4, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2004-AR6, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2004-AR7, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2004-AR8, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR3, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR5, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR6, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR7, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-AR8, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-F1, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-F2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2005-F3, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR1, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR3, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR4, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR5, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR6, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR7, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2006-AR8, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR1, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR2, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR3, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR4, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR5, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR6, STRUCTURED ASSET
MORTGAGE INVESTMENTS II TRUST
2007-AR7, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-BC5, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2006-BC6, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-BC2, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-BC3, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-BC4, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-OSI, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-WF1, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST 2007-WF2, STRUCTURED ASSET
SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH
CERTIFICATES 2004-11XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES 2004-9XS, STRUCTURED
ASSET SECURITIES CORP MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES 2004-
S2, STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES
CORP MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-10,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-13,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-15,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-16XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-17XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-19-XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-20,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-21XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-22,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-23XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-7,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-1,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-10,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-11H,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-2XS,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WF1,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORP
MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-WF2,
STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES
CORP. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-
7XS, STRUCTURES ASSET MORT PRIME
MORT TR PAS THR CER SER 2004 CL2,
and DOES 2 though 1000, inclusive,
Defendants.

[ipaper docId=91741948 access_key=key-adlown2qdidyeauioiq height=600 width=600 /]

 

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Derivatives and Bankruptcy: The Flawed Case for Special Treatment by Stephen J. Lubben

Derivatives and Bankruptcy: The Flawed Case for Special Treatment by Stephen J. Lubben

Derivatives and Bankruptcy: The Flawed Case for Special Treatment

Stephen J. Lubben

Seton Hall University – School of Law

September 8, 2008

Seton Hall Public Law Research Paper No. 1265070

U. Pa. J. Bus. Law, Vol. 12, No. 1, p. 61, 2009


Abstract:     
The putative scourge of “cherry picking” provides the foundation for the Bankruptcy Code’s special treatment of derivative contracts, which are not subject to the automatic stay or the Code’s normal rules prohibiting termination solely as a result of one party’s bankruptcy filing. Alternatively, some argue that the special treatment of derivatives is justified because “derivatives contracts are generally not firm-specific assets and therefore giving them special treatment will increase economic efficiency.” In this paper I argue that neither argument is very convincing, and that derivative contracts should be subject to the general rules of bankruptcy in most cases.

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the 99% get pulled over for speeding ..while the 1% get escorted @ 116mph driving in exotic car caravan

the 99% get pulled over for speeding ..while the 1% get escorted @ 116mph driving in exotic car caravan

via NJ.com

Amateur video captures N.J. State Police escorting high-speed sports car caravan in 2010

Video of a caravan of luxury sports cars escorted by New Jersey State Police in 2010 speeding down the Garden State Parkway.

WARNING: This video contains offensive language.

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Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD1 Comment

MATHEWS v. PHH MTG | VA SUPREME COURT “must have a face-to-face interview, “does not authorize acceleration or foreclosure if not permitted by” HUD”

MATHEWS v. PHH MTG | VA SUPREME COURT “must have a face-to-face interview, “does not authorize acceleration or foreclosure if not permitted by” HUD”

RICHARD MATHEWS, ET AL.

v.

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION

FROM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF NELSON COUNTY

J. Michael Gamble, Judge

EXCERPT:

In addition, the Regulation itself provides that “[t]he mortgagee must have a face-to-face interview with the mortgagor, or make a reasonable effort to arrange such a meeting, before three full monthly installments due on the mortgage are unpaid.” 24 C.F.R. § 203.604(b) (emphasis added).4 The Regulation is codified in Subpart C and therefore is a servicing requirement that PHH must meet “[b]efore initiating foreclosure.” 24 C.F.R. § 203.606(a) (emphasis added).

Accordingly, the face-to-face meeting requirement is a condition precedent to the accrual of the rights of acceleration and foreclosure incorporated into the Deed of Trust. Cf. Manufacturers Hanover Mortgage Corp. v. Snell, 370 N.W.2d 401, 404 (Mich. Ct. App. 1985) (suggesting that HUD’s servicing requirement regulations may be a defense to foreclosure if they are made terms of a mortgage contract).

PHH also argues that the language in the Deed of Trust should not be construed to incorporate the Regulation because the language was not bargained for by the parties; rather, it is language imposed by HUD, which requires the use of a standardized form deed of trust. We again disagree.

As noted above, the lender-beneficiary and trustee under a deed of trust have only those powers that it confers upon them. Riekse, 281 Va. at 445-46, 707 S.E.2d at 829 (2011). As a matter of Virginia law, when a deed of trust expressly states on its face that it “does not authorize acceleration or foreclosure if not permitted by” some external set of conditions identified within the deed of trust, those conditions are fully incorporated as conditions precedent to acceleration and foreclosure. HUD requires this language to be incorporated into deeds of trust which secure its federally insured loans. 24 C.F.R § 203.17(a). Doing so makes its regulations enforceable by borrowers as conditions precedent to acceleration and foreclosure as through a state-law action for breach of contract. This is entirely consistent with the intention expressed in 24 C.F.R §§ 203.500 and 203.606(a).

Conversely, PHH offers no explanation for HUD’s decision to require this language in deeds of trust which secure its insured loans if, as PHH contends, the regulations govern only the relationship between the lender and the government, rather than the lender and the borrower. The regulations themselves govern the relationship between the lender and the government; there is no reason to refer to them in the deed of trust other than to affect the duties of the parties to it. If, as PHH asserts, HUD has a contrary intention, it may either (a) cease to require or allow language that incorporates its regulations as conditions precedent to acceleration or foreclosure in the deeds of trust or (b) require or allow language that expressly states its intent that its regulations are not conditions precedent. It has done neither.

In conclusion, the terms used in Paragraphs 9 and 18 of the Deed of Trust clearly state that the rights of acceleration and foreclosure accrue only if permitted by HUD’s regulations.

[…]

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BOYD COUNTY, KY vs MERSCORP, INC., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC., MERSCORP HOLDINGS, INC., et al

BOYD COUNTY, KY vs MERSCORP, INC., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC., MERSCORP HOLDINGS, INC., et al

Courtesy of our friend Glenn Augenstein

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF KENTUCKY
AT ASHLAND

BOYD COUNTY, ex rel Phillip Hedrick, County Attorney of Boyd County, Kentucky, BREATHITT COUNTY, ex rel Brendon Miller, County Attorney of Breathitt County, Kentucky, CARTER COUNTY, ex rel Patrick Flannery, County Attorney of Carter County, Kentucky, CHRISTIAN COUNTY, ex rel Michael Foster, County Attorney of Christian County, Kentucky, CLARK COUNTY, ex rel Brian Thomas, County Attorney of Clark County, Kentucky, FLOYD COUNTY, ex rel Keith Bartley, County Attorney of Floyd County, Kentucky, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ex rel Rick Sparks, County Attorney of Franklin County, Kentucky, GREENUP COUNTY, ex rel Michael Wilson, County Attorney of Greenup County, Kentucky, JOHNSON COUNTY, ex rel Michael Endicott, County Attorney of Johnson County, Kentucky, LETCHER COUNTY, ex rel Jamie Hatton, County Attorney of Letcher County, Kentucky, MAGOFFIN COUNTY, ex rel Greg Allen, County Attorney of Magoffin County, Kentucky, MASON COUNTY, ex rel John Estill, County Attorney of Mason County, Kentucky, PIKE COUNTY, ex rel Howard Keith Hall, County Attorney of Pike County, Kentucky, WARREN COUNTY, ex rel Amy Milliken, County Attorney of Warren County, Kentucky,
on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated,
PLAINTIFFS,

v.

MERSCORP, INC., MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEM, INC., MERSCORP HOLDINGS, INC., AMERICAN LAND TITLE ASSOCIATION, BANK OF AMERICA,CCO MORTGAGE CORPORATION, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, CITIMORTGAGE, INC., CRE FINANCIAL COUNCIL, AS SUCCESSOR TO COMMERCIAL MORTGAGE SECURITIES ASSOCIATION, CORELOGIC, CORINTHIAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, EVERHOME MORTGAGE COMPANY, FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION (“FREDDIE MAC”), FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CORP., GMAC RESIDENTIAL FUNDING CORPORATION, BBVA COMPASS BANCSHARES AS SUCCESSOR TO GUARANTY BANK, HSBC FINANCE CORPORATION, MERRILL LYNCH CREDIT CORPORATION, MGIC INVESTOR SERVICES CORPORATION, MORTGAGE BANKERS ASSOCIATION INC., NATIONWIDE ADVANTAGE MORTGAGE COMPANY, PMI MORTGAGE INSURANCE COMPANY, STEWART TITLE COMPANY, SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., UNITED GUARANTY CORPORATION, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., LENDER PROCESSING SERVICES, INC., AND RECONTRUST, N.A.
DEFENDANTS.

CLASS ACTION COMPLAINT

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Home Owners Across the Nation Sue All Bank Servicers and Their Offshore Havens; Spire Law Officially Announces Filing of Landmark Lawsuit

Home Owners Across the Nation Sue All Bank Servicers and Their Offshore Havens; Spire Law Officially Announces Filing of Landmark Lawsuit

The case is styled Abeel v. Bank of America, etc., et al. — and includes such entities as ML Banderia Cayman BRL Inc., ML Whitby Luxembourg S.A.R.L. and J.P Morgan Asset Management Luxembourg S.A. — as well as hundreds of other obscure offshore entities somehow “owned” by federally chartered banks and formed “under the nose” of the Administration and the FDIC.

Yahoo-

In a lawsuit alleged to involve the largest money laundering network in United States history, Spire Law Group, LLP — on behalf of home owners across the Country — has filed a mass tort action in the Supreme Court of New York, County of Kings. Home owners across the country have sued every major bank servicer and their subsidiaries — formed in countries known as havens for money laundering such as the Cayman Islands, the Isle of Man, Luxembourg and Malaysia — alleging that while the Obama Administration was publicly encouraging loan modifications for home owners, it was privately ratifying the formation of these shell companies in violation of the United States Patriot Act, and State and Federal law. The case further alleges that through these obscure foreign companies, Bank of America, J.P. Morgan, Wells Fargo Bank, Citibank, Citigroup, One West Bank, and numerous other federally chartered banks stole hundreds of millions of dollars of home owners’ money during the last decade and then laundered it through offshore companies. The complaint, Index No. 500827, was filed by Spire Law Group, LLP, and several of the Firm’s affiliates and partners across the United States.

Far from being ambiguous, this is a complaint that “names names.” Indeed, the lawsuit identifies specific companies and the offshore countries used in this enormous money laundering scheme. Federally Chartered Banks’ theft of money and their utilization of offshore tax haven subsidiaries represent potential FDIC violations, violations of New York law, and countless other legal wrongdoings under state and federal law.

[YAHOO]

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Abigail C. Field: Assessing Schneiderman’s Task Force Gamble

Abigail C. Field: Assessing Schneiderman’s Task Force Gamble

Abigail Field-

My latest for FireDogLake. For even more confirmation that the Feds aren’t interested in bank accountability, regardless of the State half of the task force’s intentions, see Congressman Brad Miller on why he’s not the task force Executive Director and Richard Eskow on the obviousness of the problem. 

As people increasingly realize that the mortgage settlement was an enforcement fraud, attention’s turned to the “new“ joint Federal/State task force that’s supposed to make the settlement into a “down payment,” by delivering much more. And so far people don’t like what they see, and are saying so. What’s striking about the resulting PR push back, however, is that it just highlights how banker-fraud-friendly our federal government is.

For example, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman penned a Daily News Op-Ed in which he pitches “More than 50 attorneys, investigators and analysts have already been deployed to support our investigations, with many more on the way” as somehow adequate to deliver on that “down payment” promise when the Savings and Loan crisis took over 1,000 and Enron alone took over 100. Not only hasn’t the federal government corroborated AG Schneiderman’s claim of “many more on the way”; “many more” than 50+ doesn’t sound like anywhere near the 1,000+ needed to approach the ballpark of accountability.

[REALITY CHECK]

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Discover Bank v Sura | NY City Court “Credit Card Affidavit Fail of Business Records, “Account Stated”, Different Amounts Due”

Discover Bank v Sura | NY City Court “Credit Card Affidavit Fail of Business Records, “Account Stated”, Different Amounts Due”

Decided on April 26, 2012
City Court of Poughkeepsie

Discover Bank, Plaintiff,

against

Gerardo Sura, Defendant.

CV-11-3421

Crystal S.A. Scott, Esq.
Cohen & Slamowitz, LLP
Attorneys for the Plaintiff
199 Crossways Park Drive
Woodbury, NY 11797

Gerardo Sura
Defendant pro se

Katherine A. Moloney, J.

The plaintiff seeks an Order granting summary judgment pursuant to C.P.L.R. §3212, on the grounds that there are no triable issues of fact to be decided at trial. Plaintiff’s motion is supported by the affidavit of Natasha Szczygiel, dated February 16, 2012, the affirmation of Crystal S.A. Scott, Esq. dated February 22, 2012, together with exhibits A through E. On March 14, 2012, the defendant, proceeding pro se, filed opposition to plaintiff’s motion, which was supported by the affidavit of Gerardo Sura, dated March 13, 2012. Now, upon reading the notice of motion, the supporting documents, defendant’s opposition, and plaintiff’s reply and due deliberation having been held thereon, this Court finds and determines the motion as follows:

FACTS & ARGUMENTS:

On or about October 21, 2011, plaintiff filed this lawsuit against the defendant seeking to recover a sum of money totaling $4,774.61 for failure to make payments on a credit card taken out by the defendant thereby breaching the terms of the signed contract. Service was effectuated upon the defendant by substitute service on or about November 3, 2011. On November 22, 2011 issue was joined, wherein defendant interposed a general denial of the allegations together with some affirmative defenses, including a request for verification of the debt. On January 9, 2012, a preliminary conference was held with the parties and preliminary conference stipulation and order was entered into. On March 1, 2012, the plaintiff filed the instant motion arguing that the defendant has breached the terms of a signed contract by failing to make payments on the credit card, and on the grounds of an account stated. In opposition to the motion, the defendant argues that there are material issues of fact in dispute for which plaintiff is not entitled to judgment as a matter of law. In particular, defendant argues, in part, that plaintiff has not produced a signed credit card agreement, there is no evidence that the defendant paid plaintiff anything, and the affidavit upon which plaintiff [*2]relies is based upon hearsay which is irrelevant or inadmissible. As such, defendant argues that plaintiff has failed to meet its burden of proof and summary judgment should be denied.

Page 1 of 5

The basis of plaintiff’s motion is that when defendant failed to make payments due under the terms of the agreement, it breached the contract thus allowing plaintiff to recover the amount unpaid. The contract submitted in support of plaintiff’s motion is not signed by the defendant nor is it dated. Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, Exhibit A. The contract plaintiff provided to the court does not make reference to the defendant, Gerardo Sura. It consists of terms and conditions not specific to anyone other than the plaintiff, Discover Bank. Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, Exhibit A. Plaintiff also argues that the statement sent to defendant with a payment due date of April 2, 2011 establishes that an account stated has been created, and that the defendant failed to make payments or dispute the debt entitling plaintiff to summary judgment. Plaintiff seeks to recover the amount of $4,774.61. The one monthly statement provided by plaintiff shows an unpaid balance of $4,620.47. Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, Exhibit B. There are no series of monthly statements demonstrating payments or charges made on the credit card.

LEGAL ANALYSIS AND CONCLUSION:

It is well settled that “the drastic remedy of summary judgment is appropriate only where a thorough examination of the merits clearly demonstrates the absence of any triable issue of fact.” Vamattam v. Thomas, 205 AD2d 615 (2d Dept. 1994) citing Piccirillo v. Piccirillo, 156 AD2d 748 (2d Dept. 1989). The party seeking summary judgment must sufficiently establish the cause of action (or defense) and must tender evidentiary proof in admissible form to warrant the court, as a matter of law, to direct judgment in their favor. Bush v. St. Clare’s Hospital, 82 NY2d 738, 739 (1993) citing Zuckerman v. City of New York, 49 NY2d 557, 562 (1980). In short, the plaintiff bears the initial burden to show a prima facie case of entitlement to judgment by demonstrating the absence of any material issues of fact. Alverez v. Prospect Hospital et al., 68 NY2d 320 (1986); see North Fork Bank Corp. v. Graphic Forms Assoc., et al., 36 AD3d 676 (2d Dept. 2007).

In order to establish a prima facie case of entitlement to summary judgment upon a breach of contract cause of action, the plaintiff must establish, in part, the existence of an agreement, the terms of that agreement, the performance by plaintiff of its obligations pursuant to the agreement and the nonperformance by defendant of its obligations. JMG Custom Homes, Inc. v. Ryan et al., 45 AD3d 1278, 1280 (4th Dept. 2007); see Groskin v. Seedman Merchandising Group, Inc., et al., 94 AD2d 786 (2d Dept. 1983). Here, plaintiff has failed to establish the existence of an agreement or even its terms. Exhibit A is unsigned, undated, and does not even make a reference to the defendant. Thus, Exhibit A, fails to satisfy the existence of an agreement between the parties, its terms or the performance of the parties’ obligations. As such, since the plaintiff failed to meet his burden of proof as to the existence of a contract, the burden never shifted to the defendant to come forward with evidentiary facts demonstrating the existence of a material issue of fact which would defeat summary judgment on the claim that the defendant breached a contract. Moezinia v. Baroukhian, 247 AD2d 452 (2d Dept. 1998). [*3]

Yet, plaintiff also claims that it is entitled to summary judgment based upon the legal theory of an account stated. An “account stated” is an agreement between the parties that the debt is valid and due [see Citibank v. Jones, 272 AD2d 815 (2000)]. Where the defendant receives and retains the plaintiff’s account without objecting to the amount due within a reasonable time, the plaintiff is entitled to summary judgment on the account stated, independent of the obligation. Citibank v. A.E. Caputo, 8 Misc 3d 131A (2d Dept. 2005); Werner v. Nelkin, 206 AD2d 422 (2d Dept. 1994). Plaintiff does not have to submit a signed copy of an agreement in order to prevail on a motion for summary judgment based upon the account stated, but the plaintiff must establish with some other legally admissible evidence an agreement between the parties that a certain balance remains due from one to the other, and the promise of the former to pay the balance. Sherman Acquisition Ltd. Partnership v. Thomas, 8 Misc 3d 130A (2d Dept. 2005); see, Schutz v. Morette, 146 NY 137 (1895). In order to establish a prima facie cause of action for an account stated, the plaintiff must demonstrate that the plaintiff mailed to the defendant a statement of account and that the defendant retained the statement for an unreasonable period of time without objecting thereto. Discover Bank v. Williamson, 14 Misc 3d 136A (2d Dept. 2007).

Yet, as noted above, plaintiff has submitted proof of one (1) statement with the defendant’s name on it. Plaintiff’s Motion for Summary Judgment, Exhibit B. Plaintiff claims that statements were mailed to defendant advising him of the delinquency of his account, but that the defendant failed to make the required payments. Szczygiel affidavit, dated Feb. 16, 2012, ¶ 14. Exhibit B is the charge-off statement plaintiff claims was sent to defendant and retained without objection. This statement shows a balance due different from the amount plaintiff seeks to recover thereby raising a question of material fact relative to the amount of the debt – one of the things defendant disputes in his answer.In reviewing the remaining evidence provided in support of plaintiff’s motion, this Court finds that there is no legally admissible evidence to support an account stated between the parties. There is nothing conclusive before this Court proving that the plaintiff rendered monthly statements to the defendant of the charges incurred on the credit card, rather plaintiff submitted just one (1) monthly statement and relies upon the affidavit of Ms. Szczygiel, who has no direct personal knowledge, but avers that periodic written statements of account were provided to the defendant, “which reveal each transaction for which the credit card was used to purchase goods, services or cash advances, including any finances charges imposed on unpaid balances on the account and other charges that might apply; that Defendant did fail to make payments on the credit card account in accordance with the terms of the agreement between Defendant Discover.” Szczygiel affidavit, dated Feb. 16, 2012, ¶ 4. Yet, Ms. Szczygiel provides none of the details she personally reviewed in said statements, nor does she submit to the Court the statements that show all of the information that she was able to glean from the business records reviewed – except for one (1) month with a balance that does not match the amount that plaintiff seeks to recover.

Moreover, nowhere in Ms. Szczygiel’s affidavit does she set forth that the business records she bases her information upon was transmitted by a person with personal knowledge. Ms Szcygiel did not identify herself as the custodian of the business records, nor did she identify by name or otherwise the type of person working for the business who had firsthand knowledge of the charges and initially received, recorded, or transmitted the information that ultimately appeared on the credit [*4]card statements. Rather, the affidavit merely sets forth that she personally reviewed the financial information concerning the Discover credit card in question and is personally familiar with the records, electronic date and account specific information belonging to Discover. Szczygiel affidavit, dated Feb. 16, 2012, ¶ 4 and 6 . The affidavit appears to be made upon information and belief, but more importantly, it is a statement made out of court, offered for the truth of the matter asserted, and therefore constitutes hearsay. Since there is no evidence exception to the hearsay rule applicable here making the evidence admissible, the plaintiff has failed to tender evidentiary proof in admissible form to warrant, as a matter of law, summary judgment in plaintiff’s favor. Zuckerman, supra at 562.

As such, this Court finds that the plaintiff has failed to show a prima facie case of entitlement to summary judgment by demonstrating the absence of any material issues of fact. Alverez v. Prospect Hospital et al., 68 NY2d 320 (1986); see North Fork Bank Corp. v. Graphic Forms Assoc., et al., 36 AD3d 676 (2d Dept. 2007).

THEREFORE, based upon the foregoing, it is now

ORDERED, that plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment is DENIED.

All parties are directed to appear before this Court for further proceedings on this matter on May ___, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.

Dated: April 26, 2012___________________________

Poughkeepsie, New YorkKatherine A. Moloney

CITY COURT JUDGE

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50 Lehman elite got $700 million just before the 2008 crash

50 Lehman elite got $700 million just before the 2008 crash

Keep rewarding addicts and they shall continue on with destruction.

LA TIMES-

Less than a year before the 2008 collapse of Lehman Bros. plunged the global economy into a terrifying free fall, the Wall Street firm awarded nearly $700 million to 50 of its highest-paid employees, according to internal documents reviewed by The Times.

The documents, which were among the millions of pages submitted in Lehman’s bankruptcy, show the list of top earners each were pledged $8 million to $51 million in cash, stock and other compensation. How much, if any, of the stock was cashed in before the bankruptcy wiped out its value couldn’t be determined.

Still, the rich pay packages for so many people raised eyebrows even among compensation experts and provided fresh evidence of the money-driven Wall Street culture that was blamed for triggering the financial crisis.

“Many people are going to be stunned at how well some people were being paid,” said Brian Foley, an executive compensation expert in White Plains, N.Y. “This wasn’t a matter of five or six people being paid a lot.”

[LA TIMES]

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MN Attorney William Butler hit with more sanctions

MN Attorney William Butler hit with more sanctions

How about the frustration of the banks submitting fraudulent documents into court? This is very sad and just doesn’t fit right…

If someone is so inclined to start some sort of petition for this please forward it to me so I can post it over and over again.

MinnLaw Blog-

Attorney William Butler has been hit with another round of Rule 11 sanctions.

This time, U.S. District Court Judge David Doty ordered Butler to pay for the attorney fees for Wells Fargo Bank, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., Merscorp Inc and Federal National Mortgage Association.

Last month, month Doty’s colleague U.S. District Court Judge Patrick Schlitz ordered Butler to pay $50,000 in sanctions for filing repeated frivolous lawsuits and delaying cases for the purpose of collecting fees from clients.

[MINN LAW BLOG]

[ipaper docId=91568282 access_key=key-18cd9lrd4mucgcs9fnyx height=600 width=600 /]

 

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



Posted in STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD2 Comments

U.S. adds muscle to financial fraud investigations

U.S. adds muscle to financial fraud investigations

They had the chance and all the evidence was/is still there. They’re most likely trying to beat the public before anymore fraud comes out. Also elections are right around the corner.

Reuters-

An Obama administration task force probing misconduct that fueled the financial crisis is increasing its ranks, adding five financial analysts and 10 new federal prosecutors spread across the country, according to a senior Justice Department official.

The increased staffing reflects a new push by the administration to aggressively pursue cases against firms and individuals who contributed to the 2007-2009 financial crisis, especially ahead of the November election.

The U.S. Justice Department has so far brought few cases against high-profile targets since the crash.

The department closed criminal investigations without bringing charges against firms whose names are closely tied to the 2008 crash, including AIG and Countrywide.

[REUTERS]

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Turning the Tide: Preventing More Foreclosures and Holding Wrong-Doers Accountable – Testimony of John Griffith

Turning the Tide: Preventing More Foreclosures and Holding Wrong-Doers Accountable – Testimony of John Griffith

via Center For American Progress Action Fund

Testimony of John Griffith Policy Analyst Center for American Progress Action Fund

Good afternoon Co-Chairman Grijalva, Co-Chairman Ellison, and members of the caucus. I am John Griffith, an Economic Policy Analyst at the Center for American Progress Action Fund, where my work focuses on housing policy.

It is an honor to be here today to discuss ways to soften the blow of the ongoing foreclosure crisis. It’s clear that lenders, investors, and policymakers—particularly the government-controlled mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac—must do all they can to avoid another wave of costly and economy-crushing foreclosures. Today I will discuss why principal reduction—lowering the amount the borrower actually owes on a loan in exchange for a higher likelihood of repayment—is a critical tool in that effort.

Specifically, I will discuss the following:

  • First, the high cost of foreclosure. Foreclosure is typically the worst outcome for every party involved, since it results in extraordinarily high costs to borrowers, lenders, and investors, not to mention the carry-on effects for the surrounding community.
  • Second, the economic case for principal reduction. Research shows that equity is an important predictor of default. Since principal reduction is the only way to permanently improve a struggling borrower’s equity position, it is often the most effective way to help a deeply underwater borrower avoid foreclosure.
  • Third, the business case for Fannie and Freddie to embrace principal reduction. By refusing to offer write-downs on the loans they own or guarantee, Fannie, Freddie, and their regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, or FHFA, are significantly lagging behind the private sector. And FHFA’s own analysis shows that it can be a money-saver: Principal reductions would save the enterprises about $10 billion compared to doing nothing, and $1.7 billion compared to alternative foreclosure mitigation tools, according to data released earlier this month.
  • Fourth, a possible path forward. In a recent report my former colleague Jordan Eizenga and I propose a principal-reduction pilot at Fannie and Freddie that focuses on deeply underwater borrowers facing long-term economic hardships. The pilot would include special rules to maximize returns to Fannie, Freddie, and the taxpayers supporting them without creating skewed incentives for borrowers.
  • Fifth, a bit of perspective. To adequately meet the challenge before us, any principal-reduction initiative must be part of a multipronged solution that includes support for refinancing, alternative loan modifications, housing counseling, pre-foreclosure mediation, reforms to the bankruptcy code, and several other foreclosure prevention tools.

But before I go further into the possible solutions, I’d like to take a moment to lay out the negative equity crisis facing millions of American families today, many of whom have loans backed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac.

America underwater

More than five years into what is arguably the worst foreclosure crisis in American history, millions of families are still at serious risk of losing their homes. In fact, some analysts predict we’re only halfway through the crisis.

Here’s where we stand today. Banks and Wall Street firms have foreclosed on about 11 million homes since 2007, and according to analysts from Bank of America Merrill Lynch, there are more than 7 million homes still in the foreclosure pipeline. The historic decline in home prices has left nearly one in four homeowners “underwater,” meaning they owe more on their mortgage than their home is worth, adding up to more than $700 billion in total negative equity.

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, both under government conservatorship since 2008, own or guarantee about 3 million of those underwater loans, accounting for nearly $100 billion in negative equity.

Of course the housing crisis did not impact every community equally. In hard-hit cities like Las Vegas, Miami, and Phoenix, home prices have dropped more than 50 percent. Just four states—California, Florida, Arizona, and Massachusetts—account for half of the nation’s total negative equity. Still, the remaining states face serious hardships. Approximately one-third of properties with a mortgage outstanding in Michigan and Georgia are underwater, while more than 20 percent of mortgages in Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, Colorado, New Hampshire, and Illinois are underwater.

Why is negative equity such a big problem? Research shows that underwater borrowers are at higher risk of foreclosure than borrowers with more equity in their home. Certainly the amount of money a borrower actually pays on their mortgage each month relative to their income, other expenses, and other debt is a critical component of their ability to avoid default. But payment size is not the only consideration: A borrower’s equity position also matters quite a bit.

Families that are hopelessly underwater often cannot see the long-term upside from making expensive monthly payments into a bad investment—especially when their income or other expenses come under stress—and these borrowers often have trouble refinancing or selling their home down the line. On the other hand, borrowers with more equity are naturally more likely to stick it out in tough economic times by making deep cuts to other areas of spending.

When a deeply underwater borrower starts falling behind on their mortgage payments, lenders and investors have two basic options: Move forward on lengthy and expensive foreclosure procedures or work out a new deal the borrower can afford. In many cases foreclosure is not the best outcome for any party.

The administrative costs, legal fees, foregone interest, and losses on the property cost the lender about $50,000 on the typical foreclosure, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. By comparison, preventing foreclosure costs lenders about $3,300 on average. Meanwhile, the borrower will lose any initial equity in the home, face high administrative costs associated with foreclosure proceedings, and have a serious blemish on their credit history, making it much harder to obtain a loan in the future. And the borrower’s neighbors would likely see the value of their home suddenly decrease just because there was a foreclosure in the neighborhood.

A loan modification—lowering the monthly payment by either changing the interest rate, extending terms, deferring payments, reducing principal, or some combination of these steps—is often the only way to prevent costly foreclosure proceedings and keep a delinquent borrower in their home.

Each borrower has unique financial constraints, so each loan modification must be tailored to those needs. If a borrower has significant equity in their home but just saw their income reduced indefinitely, a term extension or interest-rate modification might be the best option. But if a borrower is facing a temporary spike in expenses or drop in income, then a short-term payment deferral might be preferable.

In cases where the borrower is deeply underwater and facing a long-term reduction in income or increase in mandatory spending, the most effective way to avoid foreclosure is to both reduce monthly payments and rebuild equity in the home. That’s where principal reduction—lowering the amount the borrower actually owes on their mortgage—can help.

The economic case for principal reduction

For deeply underwater loans, simply lowering the monthly payment may not be enough—borrowers also need a fighting chance at reaching positive equity over a reasonable timeframe. This is precisely why principal reductions, which help restore equity by writing down some of what is actually owed, have proven to be an effective way to stave off unnecessary foreclosures.

Reams of economic evidence back this up. A recent New York Federal Reserve Bank study concluded that re-default rates were lower for private subprime mortgage modifications involving principal forgiveness than those involving interest-rate reductions. Another from the University of North Carolina’s Center for Community Capital found that modifications combining principal write-downs and interest-rate reductions resulted in the highest repayment rates compared to other modifications.

Given these findings, it should be no surprise that many private mortgage lenders, servicers, and investors have embraced principal reductions. In the fourth quarter of 2011, banks used principal reduction for about one in four modifications on loans held in their own portfolios, according to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. And when banks modified their loans through the Treasury’s Home Affordable Modification Program, or HAMP, which provides funds to help defray the cost of write-downs and other modifications, about 43 percent included some principal reduction.

Banks are doing this because it’s good business practice, not to promote broader social or economic goals. When private firms decide whether or not to reduce principal on delinquent loans through HAMP, they run what’s called a “Net Present Value” test, modeling expected costs and cash flows in the event of foreclosure compared to several modification alternatives. Lenders, investors, and servicers are under no programmatic obligation to reduce principal, even when the Net Present Value test identifies it as the best option. But as mentioned above, many do.

That said, it’s important to note that principal reductions have a positive impact the broader housing market, which remains one of the biggest drags on our economic recovery. When a lender or servicer avoids an unnecessary foreclosure, the market price for that home stays high, helping to stabilize home prices and local housing markets. And since home prices are often derived from comparable homes in the neighborhood, that single foreclosure would also reduce home values for everyone else in the neighborhood.

Principal reductions also cause ripples throughout the economy. Homeowners with little equity, as well as anyone uncertain of the value of their property, are often reluctant to invest in renovations and upgrades. So principal reductions that bring a borrower to (or close to) positive equity should help drive up demand for home-related industries from window curtains to washing machines, while improving the overall quality of the housing stock.

At the same time, families digging their way out of mortgage debt are not spending as much on clothes, food, and other consumer goods, discouraging businesses from investing and bringing on new employees. By reducing the borrower’s debt overhang—not to mention monthly mortgage payments—principal reductions free up much-needed funds for other purchases, boosting aggregate demand.

But not all mortgage investors are convinced of the power of principal reduction. The most prominent holdouts are the country’s two biggest mortgage finance companies, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Fannie, Freddie, and FHFA’s current position on principal reduction

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, both under government conservatorship since 2008, are banned from offering principal write-downs as part of their modifications by their regulator, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, or FHFA. That’s the case despite FHFA’s own analysis showing that principal reduction would actually help the books of Fannie and Freddie in the long run compared to other foreclosure prevention approaches.

Earlier this month FHFA released an analysis focusing on Fannie- or Freddie-backed borrowers that are expected to be eligible for the Home Affordable Modification Program, which was created in 2009 to help struggling homeowners avoid foreclosure. The agency projected about 700,000 borrowers would be eligible for HAMP, being both delinquent and deeply underwater, meaning their mortgage is for an amount 115 percent or more of the current value of the home.

Here are the basic findings. If Fannie and Freddie did nothing to avoid unnecessary foreclosures, then together they would expect to lose about $63.7 billion on these loans. If the companies defer a portion of principal and interest on those loans to avoid some foreclosures, known as principal forbearance, they expect to lose significantly less: $55.5 billion. But they can stave off even more foreclosures and losses through principal reduction, resulting in just $53.7 billion in losses.

In other words, a federally supported principal reduction program will save Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac about $10 billion compared to doing nothing, and $1.7 billion compared to alternative foreclosure mitigation tools, according to the FHFA’s own analysis.

Given the overwhelming case for doing more principal reductions, why is FHFA reluctant to take this direction?  Based on comments from FHFA Acting Director Edward DeMarco, the agency appears to have three primary concerns:

  • The financial benefits of principal reduction rely heavily on taxpayer subsidies
  • The sudden availability of principal reductions could inspire some underwater borrowers to stop making payments just to qualify for assistance—what DeMarco calls “strategic modifiers”  
  • Principal reductions could impose a significant administrative burden on Fannie, Freddie, and FHFA, which could further reduce the bottom-line benefit

While these are important considerations in weighing the costs and benefits of any principal-reduction initiative, none of these concerns should be deal breakers for FHFA. Let’s examine each in turn.

Taxpayer subsidies

FHFA estimates that offering principal reductions to 700,000 Fannie- or Freddie-backed borrowers would require about $3.7 billion in payments from the U.S. Treasury through HAMP. The Obama administration recently made these funds available to Fannie and Freddie for the first time.

But it’s important to understand a key distinction here. Congress in 2009 instructed the Treasury to set aside a portion of funds through the Troubled Asset Relief Program—enacted to protect our economy from complete meltdown at the height of the financial crises—for foreclosure prevention, resulting in $29.9 billion going to HAMP. Under the new rules, Fannie, Freddie, and their servicers can now use those funds to keep more troubled borrowers in their homes through principal reduction, which is fully consistent with Congress’ initial intent.

FHFA has a very different goal in mind: to protect taxpayers by preserving the assets of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. It’s not FHFA’s role to weigh the social benefits of the foreclosure prevention programs created by Congress.

That said, we mustn’t ignore FHFA’s second congressional mandate: to foster “liquid, efficient, competitive, and resilient national housing finance markets.” The agency’s true responsibility as conservator goes beyond the simple calculus of net costs and benefits to the enterprises. On top of the financial gains, a targeted principal-reduction program would lead to fewer foreclosures, which in turn means more stable neighborhoods and stronger local housing markets.

So-called “strategic modifiers”

About three-fourths of underwater borrowers with Fannie- or Freddie-backed loans are current on their mortgage, and the last thing the Federal Housing Finance Agency wants to do is push those borrowers to miss payments unnecessarily. Indeed, the agency’s analysis shows that any financial gains from principal reduction could be wiped out if the program were to cause 90,000 borrowers to become “strategic modifiers.”

But this problem should not be overstated. First, this is not a new concern. Any modification program that reduces monthly mortgage payments, whether through interest-rate reductions, term extensions, or payment deferrals, could create skewed incentives for borrowers. There’s very little evidence that the sudden availability of principal reductions will meaningfully change borrower behavior.

Second, there are simple ways Fannie and Freddie can structure a principal-reduction program without creating skewed incentives for borrowers. One solution would be to make this a one-time program open to borrowers that are already delinquent when the program begins. Such a rule limits the borrower’s ability to default intentionally just to be eligible.

Another solution is to impose some additional cost on borrowers that receive a reduction—that is, on top of the consequences of default on the borrower’s credit score. This would make principal reduction unattractive to those who don’t truly need it. We adopted one such approach for our proposed pilot—a “shared appreciation” model, which I will discuss in detail later.

The administrative burden of principal reduction

In his latest remarks DeMarco warned that principal reductions could result in certain “operational costs,” including technological upgrades to better track loans and guidance to and training for servicers.

This is a serious concern but one that has to be put in perspective. Fannie and Freddie are responsible for more than $5 trillion in mortgage assets and remain two of the biggest and most influential financial institutions in the world. There’s no excuse for their systems and internal processes to be so far behind private banks, many of which are currently doing principal reductions. And while upgrades and training may cost money today, such an investment will likely save much more money tomorrow.

It’s time for Fannie, Freddie, and FHFA to rethink their position on principal reduction. If nothing else, this month’s preliminary analysis makes it much more difficult for FHFA to maintain an across-the-board ban on principal reductions.

The next step is to test the model in the real world. Our recent report offers one possible way to do that.

Our solution: A “shared-appreciation” modification program at Fannie and Freddie

To maximize returns to Fannie and Freddie, we propose a pilot program that reduces principal without creating skewed incentives for borrowers: so-called “shared appreciation” modifications.

Here’s how it would work. Fannie or Freddie agrees to write down the principal on deeply underwater loans to 115 percent of the home’s current value. In exchange, the borrower agrees to split any future appreciation on the home, payable at the point of resale or refinancing. We recommend operating this program through the Home Affordable Modification Program.

The borrower has a reason to keep paying, while the lender or investor benefits if and when home prices eventually stabilize and rebound. Since the borrower has to give up a meaningful share of future home price appreciation, basically establishing a cost for program participation, the shared appreciation modification is not particularly attractive to borrowers that don’t need it. This deters borrowers from defaulting on their loan just to get a reduction in principal—what some critics call the “moral hazard” problem.

That said, principal reductions should not be available to everyone. As is the case with any loan modification, a reduction in principal must be in the best interest of both the borrower and the lender, or in many cases the mortgage investor that owns the loan. This consideration must be done on a loan-by-loan basis, based on a Net Present Value test .

At this point we don’t have enough data to determine when exactly principal reduction is the best option for Fannie and Freddie compared to other modifications such as interest rate modifications or principal deferral. Indeed, that’s the main reason for a targeted pilot. For now we recommend Fannie and Freddie focus on borrowers that are most likely to benefit from a reduction, specifically borrowers that:

  • Are eligible for a principal reduction through the Home Affordable Modification Program, meaning they are seriously delinquent and their mortgage is worth at least 115 percent of the home’s current value
  • Face a long-term economic hardship, such as a non-temporary decrease in income or a permanent increase in unavoidable expenses
  • Do not have private mortgage insurance or a second lien such as a home equity loan, unless the insurer or lien holder agrees to share the write-down

That last requirement, however, requires a closer look.

Mortgage insurance

When a loan with mortgage insurance defaults, the insurance company usually bears most or all of the loss. Thus, on an individual loan it is the insurer—not Fannie or Freddie—who has the most to gain from avoiding foreclosure. That’s why the initial pilot should focus first on deeply underwater loans without mortgage insurance.

In cases where the loan is insured, Fannie and Freddie should work with the insurance provider and the borrower to find a mutually agreeable principal reduction, with shared appreciation as one available option. Another option is for the private insurer to pay a so-called “partial” or “advance” claim, providing Fannie and Freddie with a portion of the insurance claim before default, which is passed on to the borrower in the form of a principal reduction. Since the borrower is more likely to keep making payments, everyone is better off. And if the borrower defaults anyway, the insurer pays the remainder of claim, leaving Fannie and Freddie no worse off.

About 43 percent of underwater, seriously delinquent GSE loans have private mortgage insurance, according to DeMarco’s recent remarks.

Second liens

In instances where an underwater borrower has both a first and second mortgage, we strongly believe that second-mortgage investors should share the burden of any principal reduction according to their contractual position. But recent history shows that is much easier said than done, especially when the second lien is held by a different investor than the first. In cases where there is a second lien, it is often very difficult to have the second-lien holder agree to a principal reduction, with the result that the process stalls or fails completely.

To prevent a windfall to second-lien investors that refuse to embrace the write-down, we recommend this pilot to focus first on loans that do not have second mortgages. That said, we urge Fannie and Freddie to consider ways to work with second liens when reducing principal. As the first lien holder, Fannie and Freddie do have significant negotiation power over the second-lien holder since they can always move forward with foreclosure procedures.

To assist this negotiation, the Treasury Department has set aside special funds to help permanently modify second liens through the Home Affordable Modification Program, known as 2MP. All servicers participating in HAMP are required to participate in 2MP, even if they are not servicing the first mortgage. And these incentives seem to be working: Servicers last month initiated modifications on 63 percent of eligible second liens under HAMP, according to Treasury data.

It’s unclear exactly how many underwater Fannie- or Freddie-backed loans have second liens. A recent report from HousingWire estimated that less than 18 percent of GSE loans have one, but we expect that percentage to be higher for deeply underwater mortgages. Indeed, DeMarco estimates that more than a quarter of HAMP-eligible GSE loans, and perhaps even half, have an associated subordinate lien. Meanwhile, CoreLogic estimates that about 40 percent of all underwater borrowers have a home equity loan or line of credit.

All told, FHFA estimates that “well over half” of Fannie’s and Freddie’s seriously delinquent, underwater mortgages have a “third party that share the credit risk,” in the form of a second lien, a mortgage insurance, or both.”

Next steps

For years Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have set the standard for several practices in mortgage finance, including loss mitigation. But in the case of principal reductions, the enterprises are significantly lagging behind their purely private counterparts.

There are certainly complexities involved in conserving the assets of the world’s two largest mortgage firms. But principal reductions make clear economic sense, even when compared to alternative foreclosure prevention tools.

This is not a matter of charity, though targeted principal reductions will likely give hundreds of thousands of struggling homeowners a fighting chance at staying in their homes. At its core this is good business—a fact that is embraced by the private sector and confirmed by FHFA’s own analysis.

The best way to move forward is by testing the shared appreciation model. There are currently two bills, one from Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) of this caucus and another from Sen. Bob Menendez (D-NJ)  that would establish principal reduction programs with shared appreciation at Fannie and Freddie. These are helpful jumping-off points for future debate on the costs and benefits of principal reduction. And while I believe it is well within FHFA’s current regulatory power to develop this pilot without congressional approval, I encourage Congress to work with Fannie, Freddie, and their regulator to develop a program that targets those who most need a principal reduction and works in the best interest of all parties involved.

Clearly, principal reduction will not be a silver bullet to solve our housing woes. To successfully meet the needs of the more than 3 million underwater families with Fannie- or Freddie-backed loans, not to mention the millions of other borrowers also struggling to stay in their homes, principal reduction must be one part of a broader solution that includes:

  • Programs to help more borrowers that are current on their monthly payments refinance to today’s historically low interest rates, regardless of their equity position or who owns or guarantees their mortgage;
  • Incentives to encourage more lenders and servicers to pursue alternative loan modifications, such as interest rate reductions, term extensions, and principal deferrals;
  • Increased funding for pre-purchase or pre-refinance housing counseling and pre-foreclosure mediation, in which the mortgage lender or servicer negotiates terms of the delinquent mortgage in the presence of a neutral third party;
  • An expansion of deed-for-lease agreements for families that can no longer make their monthly mortgage payments but could afford a fair-market lease on the same property;
  • A more speedy and efficient process for short sales and deed-in-lieu agreements to help more struggling families avoid costly and lengthy foreclosure proceedings; and
  • Reforms to the bankruptcy code to allow courts to restructure the outstanding amount of an underwater homeowner’s mortgage debt to market value, bringing mortgages in line with other assets and liabilities.

These efforts will surely help prevent unnecessary foreclosures in the future, but they will do little to deal with the millions of foreclosures that have already happened. That’s why more must be done to stabilize local home prices, clear the glut of foreclosed properties from the for-sale market, revitalize communities hit hard by the crisis, and help the victims of foreclosure get back on their feet. Only then can we start mending a housing sector that remains one of the biggest drags on our economic recovery.

In closing, I would like to commend the co-chairmen and the members of this caucus for holding this hearing. We’re a long way from the end of the crisis, and we need to keep all options on the table moving forward.

With that, I would be happy to take any questions.

Download the testimony (pdf)

To speak with our experts on this topic, please contact:

Print: Katie Peters (economy, education, and health care)
202.741.6285 or kpeters@americanprogressaction.org

Print: Christina DiPasquale (foreign policy and security, energy)
202.481.8181 or cdipasquale@americanprogressaction.org

Print: Laura Pereyra (ethnic media, immigration)
202.741.6258 or lpereyra@americanprogressaction.org

Radio: Anne Shoup
202.481.7146 or ashoup@americanprogressaction.org

TV: Lindsay Hamilton
202.483.2675 or lhamilton@americanprogressaction.org

Web: Andrea Peterson
202.481.8119 or apeterson@americanprogressaction.org

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Burden of Proof: Geithner, the President, and Wall Street’s Unpunished Crimes

Burden of Proof: Geithner, the President, and Wall Street’s Unpunished Crimes

Richard (RJ) Eskow-

Forgery. Perjury. Investor fraud. Bribery. Money laundering. The body of evidence against individuals at the nation’s biggest banks is overwhelming. Nothing speaks louder about the banks’ guilt than this evidence — nothing, that is, except the billions they’ve paid to settle the charges.

The Administration reacted indignantly this week to suggestions it’s still slow-walking its investigation. And then, despite all this evidence, the Treasury Secretary of the United States proclaimed that no laws had been broken. And the White House wonders why its word is no longer enough?

A source in the office of a key figure in the investigation has denied a new story that they’ve ruled out criminal prosecutions. But the burden of proof has shifted. Nothing will convince the public now except action.

Straw Men

Whether it’s JPMorgan Chase settling bribery charges in Alabama, Wells Fargo settling charges of laundering drug-cartel money in Mexico, or the nation’s five largest banks buying their way out of widespread foreclosure fraud and tax evasion, never in history has so much evidence led to so little action. Investigators pinpointed the fraudulent activity of individual accountants in GE Capital’s settlement with the SEC, only to be dumbfounded to discover that no criminal indictments were handed down.

[HUFFINGTON POST]

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Eileen Foster, Former Countrywide Executive, Calls For Investigation Into Cover-Ups

Eileen Foster, Former Countrywide Executive, Calls For Investigation Into Cover-Ups

HuffPO-

A whistleblower who exposed systemic fraud by Countrywide mortgage lenders called on the Department of Justice on Wednesday to prosecute her former colleagues, if not with fraud, then with covering it up.

“If there is insufficient legal evidence to convict these executives of what we believe are obvious crimes, then the federal government should refocus,” Eileen Foster, a former Countrywide fraud investigations chief, told an audience at the National Press Club gathered to honor her and five others for their truth-telling.

“Overwhelming evidence of perjury, witness tampering and obstruction of justice exist in the numerous claims, court filings and trial and investigative transcripts,” Foster said. She herself was fired after reporting that falsified income documentation and faked signatures had been used to steer borrowers into bad mortgages.

[HUFFINGTON POST]

image: iWatchnews.org

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Rep. Maxine Waters, CPC Members to Eric Schneiderman: Hire Rep. Brad Miller as Your Cop on the Beat

Rep. Maxine Waters, CPC Members to Eric Schneiderman: Hire Rep. Brad Miller as Your Cop on the Beat

Via Fire Dog LakeMatt Stoller

Dear Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities Working Group Co-Chairs:

We are writing to you today in your capacity as co-chairs of the Residential Mortgage-Backed Securities (RMBS) Working Group to request that you select Representative Brad Miller (NC-13) to be the executive director of this new task force.

Rep. Miller has the best mix of skills and experience to steer this new Working Group. As colleagues of Rep. Miller in Congress, we’ve seen that he’s committed his career to protecting consumers and fighting financial fraud. His achievements include authorship of the Mortgage Reform and Anti-Predatory Lending Act of 2009, which was ultimately included in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. Rep. Miller also co-wrote the original legislation that led to the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has been a fierce and prescient advocate for principal reduction, and has fought to reform mortgage servicing. The Congressman has likewise been a leading advocate in Congress for the financial protection of servicemembers facing economic hardship and foreclosure.

Finally, it is important to note that prior to entering Congress in 2003, Rep. Miller was a civil litigator with 20 years of experience.

In January, President Obama announced that the RMBS Working Group “will hold accountable those who broke the law, speed assistance to homeowners and help turn the page on an era of recklessness that hurt so many Americans.” The primary means of achieving these goals is through an investigation into the creation and sale of securities backed by residential mortgages leading up to the 2008 financial crisis, and prosecution of any wrongdoing uncovered. We agree that this effort is crucial to providing long-awaited restitution to homeowners and investors, restoring the integrity of American capital markets, and preventing the next financial crisis.

With that said, we were dismayed by recent press reports indicating that the RMBS Working Group does not yet have phones, office headquarters, or an executive director. We understand that the task force is leveraging pre-existing enforcement efforts and staff at participating agencies, but we remain concerned that the Working Group has not independently established a robust infrastructure commensurate with the charge of investigating this component of the 2008 financial crisis.

With three months having passed since the initial announcement of the creation of the RMBS Working Group, we fear that this group’s efforts may be stalled. The best way to reignite this important undertaking is to hire a qualified, aggressive and committed executive director, and give them the power and budget to hire the necessary support staff. Without quick action in this regard, public confidence in the Working Group may be at risk.

We would welcome the opportunity to speak with you further about this request, and we are eager to do anything we can, as Members of Congress, to facilitate the success of the RMBS task force.

Sincerely,

[ipaper docId=91439797 access_key=key-1wnh1z1plxczx3a1396s height=600 width=600 /]

 

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Alison Frankel: Will 2nd Circuit remake AIG’s MBS case against BofA?

Alison Frankel: Will 2nd Circuit remake AIG’s MBS case against BofA?

REUTERS LEGAL-

Mortgage-backed securities litigation has been very good for some of the most obscure laws on the books. I’ve already mentioned the starring role the unheralded statute of repose has taken in bank motions to dismiss securities claims by MBS investors, and we all know about Bank of America’s ingenious (or nefarious, depending on your perspective) use of New York’s Article 77 — a proceeding so rarely invoked that the judge assigned the case had to look it up — to seek approval of its proposed $8.5 billion settlement with investors in Countrywide mortgage-backed notes. Today I bring you the Edge Act, a hundred-year-old law that grants federal-court jurisdiction to civil suits against any U.S corporation in which claims arise from international banking or banking transactions in a U.S. territory.

You’re probably wondering what the Edge Act has to do with U.S. MBS trusts in which securities are backed by U.S.-issued mortgages on properties in the United States. Well, it turns out that a handful of the mortgages backing BofA securities actually originated in the Virgin Islands and Guam. We are talking about a very small handful. According to a brief AIG submitted to the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, of the 1.7 million mortgages underlying the 349 MBS trusts at issue in AIG’s $10 billion case against Bank of America, exactly 8 mortgages in 3 trusts originated in U.S. territories.

[REUTERS ON THE CASE]

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Ally says may put mortgage unit Residential Capital (ResCap) in bankruptcy

Ally says may put mortgage unit Residential Capital (ResCap) in bankruptcy

REUTERS-

Ally Financial Inc, the U.S. government-owned lender, said its mortgage unit could file for bankruptcy, in the company’s most direct statement so far about its plans for the struggling business.

Ally Chief Executive Michael Carpenter said its Residential Capital LLC unit has been examining options that range from “staying the course” to bankruptcy.

“We think that the single most important thing that we can do to preserve and enhance shareholder value is to distance Ally from the mortgage business,” Carpenter said on a conference call with investors after the company posted quarterly earnings.

Sources have told Reuters that bankruptcy was an option for ResCap, possibly as early as mid-May, but the company had previously only hinted at the possibility. An executive said Ally failed a recent test from regulators for soundness in distressed economic situations, known as the Federal Reserve’s “stress test,” in large part because of liabilities linked to the mortgage business.

Ally, which was originally the lending arm of General Motors, said it learned on Wednesday that Chrysler Group LLC was not renewing a preferred lending agreement that will now expire next year, but executives downplayed the importance of that loss on the call.

[REUTERS]

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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700 Jumbo Shrimp or 700K Jumbo Loan – Costco is now offering mortgages

700 Jumbo Shrimp or 700K Jumbo Loan – Costco is now offering mortgages

HuffPO-

Costco wants to be your one-stop shop for everything you need in life, from groceries and cell phones to diamond rings and mortgages.

That’s right: Costco wants to help you buy a home.

In partnership with First Choice Bank and 10 other lenders, Costco is now offering mortgages, CNN Money reports.

After issuing more than 10,000 mortgages over the past year while testing the program, Costco now plans to market the mortgages more aggressively to its 66 million members, according to CNN Money.

[HUFFINGTON POST]

© 2010-17 FORECLOSURE FRAUD | by DinSFLA. All rights reserved.



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Insight: Falling home prices drag new buyers under water

Insight: Falling home prices drag new buyers under water

This is a NO SHIT SHERLOCK moment. As this site has said it time after time, it’s a crime to lend money today very well knowing the housing values are depreciating!

FHA caters to first time buyers and this includes no ownership in a principal residence during a 3year period. This also caters mainly to those who don’t have any money… sounds a lot like the subprime market, now doesn’t it?

This is deliberate F R A U D and another bailout coming your way.

REUTERS-

More than 1 million Americans who have taken out mortgages in the past two years now owe more on their loans than their homes are worth, and Federal Housing Administration loans that require only a tiny down payment are partly to blame.

That figure, provided to Reuters by tracking firm CoreLogic, represents about one out of 10 home loans made during that period.

It is a sobering indication the U.S. housing market remains deeply troubled, with home values still falling in many parts of the country, and raises the question of whether low-down payment loans backed by the FHA are putting another generation of buyers at risk.

As of December 2011, the latest figures available, 31 percent of the U.S. home loans that were in negative equity – in which the outstanding loan balance exceeds the value of the home – were FHA-insured mortgages, according to CoreLogic.

[REUTERS]

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